The Great Debate

from Nicholas Wapshott:

Yellen shows her hand

By Nicholas Wapshott
April 19, 2014

The difference between the Federal Reserve Board of Chairwoman Janet Yellen and that of her immediate predecessor Ben Bernanke is becoming clear. No more so than in their approach to the problem of joblessness.

from Nicholas Wapshott:

The EU-U.S. love-hate relationship

By Nicholas Wapshott
April 11, 2014

The elaborate gavotte between the American and European economies continues.

While the Federal Reserve has begun to wind down its controversial quantitative easing (QE) program, the European Central Bank (ECB) the federal reserve of the eurozone, has announced it is considering a QE program of its own.

Obama: Ineffectually Challenged

By Bill Schneider
April 2, 2014

President Barack Obama is in a funk. Americans are coming to see the president as ineffectual. That is a dangerous perception.

U.S. power: Down but still unrivaled

By Glenn Hubbard and Tim Kane
May 21, 2013

This essay is adapted from the author’s new bookBalance: The Economics of Great Powers from Ancient Rome to Modern America.”

Why public debt is not like credit card debt

By Robert Kuttner
January 14, 2013

One big part of the well-financed campaign for economic austerity is the contention that the public debt is like a national credit card. If we keep charging on it, the argument goes, we’ll get overwhelmed with interest costs, suffer a reduced standard of living and, pretty soon, go bankrupt.

from The Great Debate UK:

Fiscal cliff deal is depressingly European

January 4, 2013

--Laurence Copeland is a professor of finance at Cardiff University Business School. The opinions expressed are his own.--

The myth of America’s decline

By Michael Moran
April 12, 2012

This is an excerpt from “The Reckoning: Debt, Democracy and the Future of American Power,” published this week by Palgrave Macmillan.

What do Rick Perry and pro sports teams have in common?

By Guest Contributor
October 28, 2011

By Matt Rognlie
The opinions expressed are his own.

They use the same shady economic methodology to promote their policies.

If you follow the news, you’re familiar with “IMPLAN”, albeit indirectly. It’s the software package underlying the studies that pro sports teams, among others clamoring for public favors, use to claim that each new stadium will generate several gazillion dollars for the local economy—supposedly justifying a massive public outlay. Here’s a study using IMPLAN to justify a new Sacramento Kings stadium; here’s another that looks at the proposed Santa Clara stadium for the 49ers and another that attempts to justify a new stadium for the A’s. There are studies looking at the impact of the Mavericks’ American Airlines Center, the Packers’ Lambeau Field, and Oriole Park. And, of course, there are countless others: whenever someone wants to make preposterous claims about the benefits of his pet project, he’ll inevitably turn to IMPLAN or a similar package.

from Reuters Money:

Deficit cutting need not be cruel

December 2, 2010

SPAIN-ECONOMY/Congress needn't be cruel to be kind in cutting the U.S. budget deficit while saving popular programs like Social Security and Medicare.

America as an export nation?

By Reuters Staff
July 30, 2010

The following is a guest post by Bruce Katz, Emilia Istrate and Jonathan Rothwell. Mr. Katz is the editor of several books on transportation, demographics and regionalism, including “Elevate Our Cities.”  Ms. Istrate is a senior research analyst with the Metropolitan Infrastructure Initiative. Mr. Rothwell is a senior research analyst at the Metropolitan Policy program focusing on urban economics, innovation, and economic opportunity. The opinions expressed are their own.