The Great Debate

China can outgrow overcapacity, at least for now

December 2, 2009

WeiGucrop.jpg– Wei Gu is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are her own —

China watchers are worried that excessive lending leads to massive overcapacity. However, the risk of Beijing pressing too hard on the brake is even greater. At least for now, China should be able to growing its way out of its bad debt problems.

Mickey’s Magic needed for Disneyland Shanghai

By Wei Gu
November 4, 2009

WeiGucrop.jpg– Wei Gu is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are her own —

China has finally given a green light for Disneyland to build a theme park in Shanghai. Negotiations that started when Bill Clinton was in the White House have concluded just before President Barack Obama is due to visit. The approval looks like a coup for Walt Disney Co, but it will take all of Mickey’s magic to prevent the park from becoming another government-financed loss maker.

Winning the copyright battle in China

October 28, 2009

WeiGucrop.jpg– Wei Gu is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are her own —

When it comes to protecting intellectual property in China, the United States often feels that its pleas are falling on deaf ears. Its best hope is that China recognizes that copyright protection is in its own interests. To achieve that, Washington needs to push for changes from within.

Imagine when China runs a trade deficit

By Wei Gu
September 28, 2009

WeiGucrop.jpg– Wei Gu is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are her own —

If current trends continue, China might swing to a trade deficit in the not-too-distant future. Given that China has enjoyed more than a decade of strong exports, this may sound a bit far-fetched. But even if it happens, this would not necessarily be something for the world to worry about.

China’s start-up market can win against the odds

September 25, 2009

wei-gu.jpg– Wei Gu is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are her own —

It is hard to be very optimistic about China’s proposed stock market for start-up companies. After all, similar attempts in other countries have a decidedly mixed track record. Why would China, where small private companies face an uphill battle against state-owned firms, be any exception?

For Chinese exporters, grass is greener abroad

September 17, 2009

WeiGucrop.jpg- Wei Gu is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are her own. -

The U.S.-China tire dispute threatens to spill into other sectors and squeeze Chinese exporters’ already razor-thin margins further. It might seem mind-boggling to many that Chinese manufacturers are still hanging on to weak overseas markets even though the domestic economy looks much healthier and surely offers more potential.

Ex-Google China chief’s dream factory

By Wei Gu
September 11, 2009

wei-gu.jpg– Wei Gu is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are her own —

Google’s former China head Kai-Fu Lee wants to create China’s next internet giant in a factory. He believes that by combining the smartest entrepreneurs, the shrewdest businesspeople and the brightest business ideas, he will be able to create five highly sellable companies a year. That sounds like an ideal model for venture capital, but is he being realistic?

China finds tricky export niche amid global slump

By Wei Gu
September 4, 2009

WeiGucrop.jpg– Wei Gu is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are her own —

As exports of manufactured goods slow, China has found a new niche — exporting its construction boom.

China stock jitters look overdone

By Wei Gu
September 2, 2009

WeiGucrop.jpg– Wei Gu is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are her own —

Just as Chinese stocks often rise without fundamental support, they are now tanking even though companies just had a better-than-expected earnings season.

Yuan trade settlement mission impossible, for now

By Wei Gu
August 27, 2009

wei-gu.jpg– Wei Gu is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are her own —

The People’s Bank of China’s ambitious plan to settle foreign trades in yuan has been given the cold shoulder by companies both at home and abroad. The failure of this experiment shows the difficulties China faces in internationalising its currency.