Comments on: A local obstruction in the fracking pipeline http://blogs.reuters.com/hallieseegal/2012/12/11/a-local-obstruction-in-the-fracking-pipeline/ Wed, 12 Dec 2012 20:54:38 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: sidevalve56 http://blogs.reuters.com/hallieseegal/2012/12/11/a-local-obstruction-in-the-fracking-pipeline/#comment-5 Wed, 12 Dec 2012 20:54:38 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/hallieseegal/?p=7#comment-5 Its good that these discussions are taking place. Natural gas in itself is a very important resource for the US. However, some of the processes associated with accessing and drilling for natural gas can be a large source of pollution. I’m not cheerleading for or against at this point…I’m merely pointing out some pros and cons. I think a really important thing is that the public needs to be better aware of the process of finding, drilling, and piping of natural gas. They also need to be aware of the importance of natural gas and the role it has for the future of this country. Hopefully with better knowledge on the subject; lawmakers, businesses, and citizens can better develop a natural gas system that can supply us with an important resource without causing undue pollution to the land.

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By: LarryLinn http://blogs.reuters.com/hallieseegal/2012/12/11/a-local-obstruction-in-the-fracking-pipeline/#comment-4 Wed, 12 Dec 2012 16:58:18 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/hallieseegal/?p=7#comment-4 When I was dumping the trash this morning I came across a paper which stated that the Department of Environment in Pennsylvania (DEP) is required by law to investigate homeowner complaints of drinking water contamination related to oil and gas drilling and issue a written determination of its findings to the homeowner. Complaints come to DEP’s Oil and Gas Division (OGD), which then sends a request to DEP’s Bureau of Laboratories (BOL) to conduct the testing. BOL tests all drinking water according to EPA standards, which require testing for a range of dangerous contaminants including 24 dangerous metals.
But just because BOL tests for these metals, that doesn’t mean OGD will see all of those results. Each request sent by OGD comes with a specialized so-called “suite code,” which, in some cases, causes the BOL to withhold important parts of the results. (For a really useful graphic on this system, click here). In the fracking context, Director Upadhyay’s testimony shows that one code, 942, has been used to exclude fully two thirds of the testing results—16 of the 24 required metals—from the lab reports it sends to OGD and to affected residents. (Codes 943 and 946 have been used to similar effect.) These metals include aluminum, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, silicon, lithium, molybdenum, titanium, vanadium, and boron. Not only are many of these found in wastewater from fracking, in excess doses they are also known to cause health problems like diarrhea, vomiting, immune and nervous system damage, and cancer. But I am only the janitor.

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