Opinion

Hugo Dixon

Letter to the Greeks

Hugo Dixon
Jun 29, 2011 13:38 UTC

By Hugo Dixon
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Dear Greeks,
The anger you feel about your plight is understandable. You are staring at several unpalatable alternatives, all of which will involve big cuts in living standards for years to come. But the options you face are not all equally bad. You must avoid an emotional reaction that leaves you in an even worse state — and you must ostracise those who resort to violence.

One option is to persuade your politicians to say “no” (or “ohi”) to the euro zone/International Monetary Fund austerity plan. The scheme is not perfect. But rejecting it out of hand would be childish. If there is no agreed plan, you will get no money. The consequence isn’t just that the government would default on the loans it took out on your behalf. There would be a run on your banks and an even deeper recession. You would probably also lose your remaining friends in Europe who would consider you spoiled brats.

That’s not to say you should repay all your debts. Even with Herculean efforts, that won’t be possible. But you can probably negotiate an orderly default some time in the next year. An orderly default would be one where your debts were cut, say in half, but in the context of an agreed euro zone/IMF programme which provided you with enough money to survive until you are healthier.

You might ask why you can’t have an “orderly” default now. Wouldn’t that be better than waiting? The answer would be “yes” if an orderly default could be agreed now. Unfortunately, the rest of Europe isn’t yet ready for your default. So they won’t agree on one; and that, by definition, means a default now would be disorderly.

Greek Plan B needs two elements

Hugo Dixon
Jun 28, 2011 21:06 UTC

By Hugo Dixon
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

LONDON — The European Union is finally working on a plan B in the unlikely case that Greece’s parliament votes against austerity later this week. The priority in such a plan should be swift action by the European Central Bank to protect the rest of Europe’s banking system from mayhem. The EU should also try to give Athens a second chance to reflect on its folly.

The most dangerous immediate consequence of a No vote would be an acceleration of deposit flight from Greek banks. This could sow panic in banks in other peripheral nations. One way of stopping that would be for the ECB to immediately make clear that buckets of liquidity are available for non-Greek banks. Ideally, this shouldn’t just be short-term money, but medium-term money too. Euro zone governments should underwrite any losses the ECB incurred on such emergency support.

How the euro zone can save itself

Hugo Dixon
Jun 20, 2011 15:05 UTC

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

By Hugo Dixon

Greece is likely to receive another short-term sticking plaster after the euro zone’s leaders stared into the abyss. But a repeat of the drama of recent days is all too possible. The region can, and must, protect itself against Athenian delinquency.

Euro zone finance ministers have postponed a final decision on extending 12 billion euros of emergency loans to Greece. But the country should get the next tranche of its EU/IMF bailout program in early July. Around the same time, the authorities should agree to a new package of perhaps 120 billion euros that sees Greece through until end 2014 –- with private-sector creditors helping by rolling over their debts in some yet-to-be-determined quasi-voluntary manner. Athens still has the capacity to mess things up if it can’t get its parliament to approve the new austerity program. But following Friday’s cabinet reshuffle, the government looks like it will at least survive a no-confidence vote on June 21.

Greece mustn’t waste its second chance

Hugo Dixon
Jun 6, 2011 20:00 UTC

By Hugo Dixon
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

LONDON — Greece mustn’t waste its second chance. Athens looks like it will receive enough bailout cash to see it through to end-2013. But if it veers off track again, as is all too possible, any third chance might come with such extreme conditions that a messy default and a humiliating exit from the euro wouldn’t be far away.

The euro zone and International Monetary Fund are willing to provide more cash partly because the European Central Bank has scared Athens’ saviours into believing that a Greek default now would trigger a nightmarish set of domino collapses across the continent. In return, Greece has promised to raise the equivalent of 22 percent of GDP through privatisation by 2015, as well as squeezing another 10 percent of GDP from its fiscal deficit. There is also a plan to bail in private-sector creditors, albeit on a “voluntary” basis. That could cut the amount of new bailout money to perhaps 30 billion euros, out of a total funding hole of 65 billion euros.