Cyprus controls an “omnishambles”

By Hugo Dixon
March 28, 2013

Cyprus’ capital controls are an “omnishambles”. If the Argentine-style “corralito” really can be lifted in seven days, the damage could be contained. But that doesn’t seem credible. Extended controls could spawn bribery, sap confidence, further crush the economy, spread contagion and ultimately lead to the country’s exit from the euro.

Cyprus deal best of a very bad job

By Hugo Dixon
March 25, 2013

Cyprus’ economy is going to suffer terribly in the next few years. Some of that is inevitable given how bloated the banking system had become. But the disastrous handling of the crisis, especially in the past week, will make things much worse.

Cyprus must avoid capital controls

By Hugo Dixon
March 24, 2013

Imposing capital controls would be a historic mistake for Cyprus and the euro zone – even worse than the crass idea of taxing uninsured deposits. Non-cash transactions would be limited, while withdrawals from cash machines would be rationed.

Cyprus will pay dearly for its sins

By Hugo Dixon
March 22, 2013

Cyprus will pay dearly for its sins. The Mediterranean island has committed many follies over the years – and is still making mistakes.

All Cyprus plan Bs look dreadful

By Hugo Dixon
March 20, 2013

The Cypriots have an expression: eninboro allo. It means: I cannot take any more of it.

Cyprus deposit grab sets bad precedent

By Hugo Dixon
March 18, 2013

Cyprus’ deposit grab sets a bad precedent. Money had to be found to prevent its financial system collapsing. But imposing a 6.75 percent tax on insured deposits – or even the 3 percent being discussed on Monday morning – is a type of legalised bank robbery. Cyprus should instead impose a bigger tax on uninsured deposits and not touch small savers.

Markets too sanguine about Italy

By Hugo Dixon
March 11, 2013

The markets are too sanguine about Italy. The country’s politics and economics are messed up – and there are no easy solutions. And while Rome does have the European Central Bank as a backstop, it may have to get to the brink before using it.

Spain probably won’t catch Italian flu

By Hugo Dixon
March 4, 2013

One knee-jerk reaction to Italy’s shock election was to worry about contagion to Spain. As Rome’s bond yields shot up last Tuesday, Madrid’s were dragged up in sympathy. These are the two troubled big beasts of the euro zone periphery and an explosion in either of them could destroy the single currency.