Opinion

Hugo Dixon

EU leaders need to kickstart reform

Hugo Dixon
May 26, 2014 08:32 UTC

By Hugo Dixon

Hugo Dixon is Editor-at-Large, Reuters News. The opinions expressed are his own.

When European Union leaders dine in Brussels on May 27, conversation is likely to revolve around three Ps: the poll, the priorities and the people.

Many of those sitting around the table, notably France’s François Hollande and Britain’s David Cameron, received a drubbing in the European Parliament elections. They will be reflecting on the rise of euroscepticism in many EU countries and the appropriate forms of response.

There are basically four main options: stick with the status quo; push for further European integration; unravel some of the integration that has already been achieved; and reform the EU to boost competitiveness.

The main underlying source of disenchantment is the recession still gripping some parts of the EU. Given the high level of unemployment, particularly among the young, and the likely slow pace of economic recovery, maintaining the status quo is an option that can be quickly ruled out.

How to fix the UK’s housing mess

Hugo Dixon
May 19, 2014 09:56 UTC

By Hugo Dixon

Hugo Dixon is Editor-at-Large, Reuters News. The opinions expressed are his own.

The Achilles’ heel in Britain’s strong economic recovery is the mess in the housing market.

House prices are rising yet again – by 10.9 percent in the year to April, according to Nationwide. This raises the risk of yet another cycle of boom and bust, so much so that the Bank of England recently described rising house prices as the “brightest light” on its risk dashboard.

Scoxit could lead to Brexit

Hugo Dixon
May 12, 2014 08:55 UTC

By Hugo Dixon

Hugo Dixon is Editor-at-Large, Reuters News. The opinions expressed are his own.

If the Scots vote to leave the UK in September, that could trigger a chain reaction which leads to the rest of the UK quitting the European Union. This is a threat British pro-Europeans need to take seriously given that a Scottish independence vote is quite possible, though the chances are still less than 50 percent.

Were it not for the Scotland factor, the risk of a so-called Brexit – Britain’s exit from the EU – would be receding. A string of business leaders have in recent months come out and argued that the economy would be damaged if the UK lost full access to the EU’s single market.

Do national champions merit protection?

Hugo Dixon
May 5, 2014 06:28 UTC

By Hugo Dixon

Hugo Dixon is Editor-at-Large, Reuters News. The opinions expressed are his own.

The French always protect their national champions, while the British have a laissez-faire approach to foreign takeovers of their top companies, right? That is certainly the caricature. Witness how France deterred PepsiCo from bidding for Danone in 2005 on the grounds that yoghurt was a strategic industry, while the UK allowed U.S.-based Kraft to move ahead with its hostile bid for Cadbury, the confectioner, in 2010.

Recent events, though, show that the picture is somewhat more complex. When news first leaked that General Electric, the U.S. industrial giant, was negotiating to buy Alstom’s power generation business, the French government’s knee-jerk reaction was hostile. But by last week, Alstom had reached a deal to sell its power unit to GE for 11.4 billion euros and Paris had softened its opposition.