Greece needs a second election

By Hugo Dixon
May 25, 2015

Greece_Tsipras.jpg

Hugo Dixon is Editor-at-Large, Reuters News. The opinions expressed are his own.

Greece seemingly has no Plan A or Plan B on debt

By Hugo Dixon
May 11, 2015
Greek Finance Minister Varoufakis arrives on a motorbike at Maximos Mansion to attend a governmental meeting with Prime Minister Tsipras in Athens

Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis arrives on a motorbike at Maximos Mansion to attend a governmental meeting with Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras in Athens May 10 2015. REUTERS/Kostas Tsironis

Tsipras needs rupture with far-left, not Brussels

By Hugo Dixon
March 30, 2015

By Hugo Dixon

Hugo Dixon is Editor-at-Large, Reuters News. The opinions expressed are his own.

Is the ECB being unfair to Greece?

By Hugo Dixon
March 11, 2015

By Hugo Dixon

Hugo Dixon is Editor-at-Large, Reuters News. The opinions expressed are his own.

Greek euro exit will be hard to stop

By Hugo Dixon
February 9, 2015

By Hugo Dixon

Hugo Dixon is Editor-at-Large, Reuters News. The opinions expressed are his own.

Markets right to worry about euro zone

By Hugo Dixon
October 20, 2014

By Hugo Dixon

Hugo Dixon is Editor-at-Large, Reuters News. The opinions expressed are his own.

UK faces unpalatable election choice

By Hugo Dixon
September 29, 2014

By Hugo Dixon

Hugo Dixon is Editor-at-Large, Reuters News. The opinions expressed are his own.

ECB faces severest stress test

By Hugo Dixon
February 24, 2014

A lot is riding on the cleanup of euro zone lenders being overseen by the European Central Bank. The progress so far is encouraging. But clarity is needed on a few points to ensure that lenders really do get a good scrubbing and are therefore able to support the zone’s fragile economic recovery.

ECB really must act on deflation

By Hugo Dixon
November 4, 2013

The case for looser monetary policy should be clear when the European Central Bank governing council convenes in Frankfurt on Thursday. The question is what tools to use: lower interest rates, spraying the banks with more cheap long-term money or the ECB’s first dose of “quantitative easing”. The answer should be a mixture of all three.

Euro zone needs anti-boom activism

By Hugo Dixon
September 23, 2013

A big problem with the euro zone’s one-size-fits-all monetary policy is that it risks fitting nobody. That, indeed, was a key cause of the crisis. Early in the century, countries such as Spain and Ireland were booming, while Germany was in the doldrums. Setting interest rates at a level that worked well for the euro zone on average had the effect of inflating the Spanish and Irish property bubbles while pushing up wages so their economies became uncompetitive. When the bubbles burst, the damage was devastating.