Opinion

Hugo Dixon

Six solutions for the UK housing crisis

Hugo Dixon
Jun 9, 2014 09:28 UTC

By Hugo Dixon

Hugo Dixon is Editor-at-Large, Reuters News. The opinions expressed are his own.

Britain’s main economic problem is that the supply of homes isn’t rising nearly as fast as demand. This doesn’t just create the risk of a new housing bubble; young people are finding it increasingly hard to find places to live, especially in crowded London and southeast England. So I make no apologies for returning to the topic after only three weeks.

The solution isn’t mainly to build new homes on greenfield sites. It is understandable that Brits don’t want to concrete over this green and pleasant land. Rather, the thrust of policy should be to use existing housing stock much more effectively, while building new homes in cities.

Look first at the existing stock. It’s not quite as tight as people think, but a lot of it is under-occupied or some even unoccupied. Rich people, including foreigners who buy houses and sometimes leave them empty for large chunks of time, have lots of spare space. So do many old people, who are often living in homes that suited them when they had large young families.

There’s nothing wrong with people wanting to have big houses. But the government shouldn’t be encouraging them to do so. That’s precisely what the current tax system does. Not only is housing woefully under-taxed; expensive homes are taxed much less as a proportion of their value than cheap homes. Effectively, the poor are subsidising the well off.

Do national champions merit protection?

Hugo Dixon
May 5, 2014 06:28 UTC

By Hugo Dixon

Hugo Dixon is Editor-at-Large, Reuters News. The opinions expressed are his own.

The French always protect their national champions, while the British have a laissez-faire approach to foreign takeovers of their top companies, right? That is certainly the caricature. Witness how France deterred PepsiCo from bidding for Danone in 2005 on the grounds that yoghurt was a strategic industry, while the UK allowed U.S.-based Kraft to move ahead with its hostile bid for Cadbury, the confectioner, in 2010.

Recent events, though, show that the picture is somewhat more complex. When news first leaked that General Electric, the U.S. industrial giant, was negotiating to buy Alstom’s power generation business, the French government’s knee-jerk reaction was hostile. But by last week, Alstom had reached a deal to sell its power unit to GE for 11.4 billion euros and Paris had softened its opposition.

Why Draghi likes London

Hugo Dixon
May 27, 2013 09:26 UTC

When Mario Draghi was appointed President of the European Central Bank, the German tabloid Bild gave him a Prussian helmet because it admired his Teutonic anti-inflation credentials. The Sun, Bild’s British equivalent, should give him keys to the City of London because of his pro-market credentials.

Draghi likes London. The Italian still has a flat in the city, kept from his time as a Goldman Sachs banker. He is a man with a natural affinity for the markets.

Last week Draghi was in London, the scene of his July 2012 promise to “do whatever it takes to preserve the euro”. The ECB President’s message this time was that Europe needs a more European UK as much as the United Kingdom needs a more British Europe.

Hugo Dixon: How to respond to UKIP’s surge

Hugo Dixon
May 6, 2013 02:33 UTC

By Hugo Dixon

(Hugo Dixon is Editor-at-Large, Reuters News. The opinions expressed are his own.)

The UK Independence Party will not come close to winning Britain’s next general election. The populist anti-Europe, anti-immigration party may not even win a single seat, despite last week’s surge in English local elections where it won nearly a quarter of the vote – running a close third to Labour and the Conservatives. That’s how the maths of Britain’s first-past-the-post voting system works.

Nevertheless, the rise of UKIP could have profound consequences for British politics and business – in particular, for the UK’s relationship with the European Union. This is because UKIP is mainly taking votes away from David Cameron’s Conservatives. A calculation by Sky News suggested that, if the local election results were translated into a general election, Labour would win an overall majority. Even though UKIP might win no seats itself, its popularity would damage Cameron’s prospects for reelection in 2015.