By Hugo Dixon

Hugo Dixon is Editor-at-Large, Reuters News. The opinions expressed are his own.

Matteo Renzi is on a roll. The Italian prime minister is a brilliant politician. His youthful dynamism has bought him time with his people, the markets and the European Union to carry out the immense job of reforming Italy. But he has yet to show he can execute. He now needs to, because even his time will run out.

Renzi has had a good four months in the job after he pushed aside his predecessor Enrico Letta. His emphatic victory in the European Parliament elections gave him a legitimacy that the murky manner of his ascension lacked.

He is in the astonishing position of dominating not just the left of Italian politics, from which he comes, but also the centre – as well as being popular with the right. The latter is in disarray as Silvio Berlusconi’s career has disintegrated. Meanwhile, Renzi has managed the feat of portraying himself as anti-system, despite being prime minister. This has undercut the appeal of Beppe Grillo’s protest movement. Renzi looks like he’ll stay in the job for three years and maybe many more.

He has also turned his charms on Europe. He has succeeded in simultaneously forging a good relationship with Germany’s right-wing Angela Merkel and being seen as a champion for the European left. Renzi brokered a deal at last month’s EU summit giving countries more fiscal flexibility provided they stick within the euro zone’s budget rules.