Opinion

Hugo Dixon

Scoxit could lead to Brexit

Hugo Dixon
May 12, 2014 08:55 UTC

By Hugo Dixon

Hugo Dixon is Editor-at-Large, Reuters News. The opinions expressed are his own.

If the Scots vote to leave the UK in September, that could trigger a chain reaction which leads to the rest of the UK quitting the European Union. This is a threat British pro-Europeans need to take seriously given that a Scottish independence vote is quite possible, though the chances are still less than 50 percent.

Were it not for the Scotland factor, the risk of a so-called Brexit – Britain’s exit from the EU – would be receding. A string of business leaders have in recent months come out and argued that the economy would be damaged if the UK lost full access to the EU’s single market.

All the opinion polls by YouGov since the start of March have shown a lead, varying between 2 and 6 percentage points, for Britain wanting to stay in the EU. In the previous year, YouGov’s polls were consistently in favour of pulling out with one showing a lead of 17 points for the “Out” campaign.

This switch-around has happened despite the fact that the UK Independence Party, which wants to pull out of the EU, is expected to get the most votes in this month’s European Parliament elections. UKIP’s rise, on the back of leader Nigel Farage’s formidable debating skills, seems driven more by disaffection with London politics and immigration than a strong desire to quit the EU.

Independent Scotland won’t keep the pound

Hugo Dixon
Feb 3, 2014 09:44 UTC

An independent Scotland will not keep the pound. That’s despite this being the express wish of the Scottish government, which is campaigning for independence in September’s referendum. The reason is that it’s hard to see the rest of the UK agreeing to such a deal – except on terms that would affront Scotland’s amour propre.

One can understand why Edinburgh is keen not to change its monetary arrangements. If Scotland had its own free-floating currency, it would be less economically integrated with the rest of the UK. Given that 60 percent of its exports and 70 percent of its imports are with the rest of the UK, such a separation would hit hard.

A separate currency would also cause trouble for the outsized Scottish banking sector. Banking assets are more than 12 times GDP – nearly double the ratio for Iceland, Ireland and Cyprus before their banking industries blew up. The Scottish people might also worry that a Scottish currency could fall in value, devaluing their savings.