Regulation Correspondent, Europe
Huw's Feed
Nov 7, 2013

EU executive rejects delay in derivatives reporting

LONDON, Nov 7 (Reuters) – Users of financial derivatives in
the European Union will have to report their trades from early
next year after the bloc’s executive vetoed a request from
regulators for a delay.

A delay would hinder the ability of regulators to spot
potentially destabilising risks building up in markets, the EU’s
executive European Commission said.

Nov 6, 2013

UK companies may have to publish financial risks

LONDON, Nov 6 (Reuters) – Britain’s listed companies may
have to publish details of risks that could put them out of
business and auditors will have to verify all the risks have
been properly disclosed, in reforms proposed by the accounting
watchdog.

The Financial Reporting Council (FRC) wants a cultural
change to end box-ticking exercises of the past. Its proposed
reforms follow the 2007-09 financial crisis which saw banks
being rescued by taxpayers despite accountants giving them a
clean bill of health just months before.

Nov 5, 2013

Derivatives industry under the gun to amend contracts

LONDON, Nov 5 (Reuters) – Central bankers and regulators
have increased the pressure on the $630 trillion derivatives
industry to alter how it operates to avoid a repeat of the
mayhem seen after Lehman Brothers collapsed.

Markets went into meltdown in Sept. 2008 as it was unclear
who was exposed to the stricken U.S. lender’s derivatives
holdings.

Nov 5, 2013

Global watchdog says new body with teeth needed to police markets

LONDON (Reuters) – A new global watchdog with binding powers is needed to resolve disputes like the current clash over derivatives rules that threatens to undermine financial stability, top market officials said.

The European Union and United States are trying to iron out differences between each other’s rules to regulate the $630 trillion market for off-exchange traded derivatives like credit default swaps and interest rate swaps.

Nov 4, 2013

EU lawmakers pledge speedy Libor reform, scope debated

LONDON, Nov 4 (Reuters) – European Union lawmakers have
pledged rapid approval of a draft EU law to regulate market
benchmarks such as Libor, though they sparred over how
comprehensive the new regime should be.

Big fines for Barclays and other banks over the
past 18 months for rigging interest rate benchmarks such as the
London Interbank Offered Rate or Libor, prompted the European
Union to propose the rules to supervise such indexes for the
first time.

Oct 31, 2013

EU’s Barnier warns about softening new bond trading rules

LONDON, Oct 31 (Reuters) – European Union rules being
finalised to regulate derivatives and bond trading are too
light-touch and will leave markets in the dark, EU financial
services chief Michel Barnier has said.

Barnier has told Markus Ferber, a German member of the
European Parliament who is leading negotiations on the new
rules, he was concerned about how they are evolving.

Oct 31, 2013

Banking regulators propose tougher rules on trading books

LONDON (Reuters) – Banks using in-house mathematical models to value their trading book risks should also use a standardized approach as a backstop, global banking industry regulators said on Thursday.

The Basel Committee of banking supervisors from nearly 30 countries have published a second, more detailed 127-page consultation on reforming how risks on trading books are calculated after finding wide discrepancies among banks.

Oct 30, 2013

New rule to ring in costly accounting change for telcos

LONDON, Oct 30 (Reuters) – Standard setters have reached
broad agreement on the first global rule telling companies how
to book revenues in a reform that may encourage listings and
bump up IT costs for telcos.

Revenue is the most important line in a company’s earnings
statement and policymakers want to make it easier for investors
to compare firms and help bring down the cost of capital by
making markets more efficient and transparent.

Oct 30, 2013

FCA to crack down on fund manager fees

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain’s financial regulator plans to crack down on the 5.2 trillion pound ($8.4 trillion) fund management sector for unfairly making customers pay too many of its costs, its chief executive said on Wednesday.

Asset managers pay brokers commission to cover trading fees and for research to help work out investment strategies, and are allowed to pass the cost on to their own customers, who also pay an investment fund an annual management fee.

Oct 30, 2013

British watchdog to crack down on fund manager fees

LONDON, Oct 30 (Reuters) – Britain’s financial regulator
plans to crack down on the 5.2 trillion pound ($8.4 trillion)
fund management sector for unfairly making customers pay too
many of its costs, its chief executive said on Wednesday.

Asset managers pay brokers commission to cover trading fees
and for research to help work out investment strategies, and are
allowed to pass the cost on to their own customers, who also pay
an investment fund an annual management fee.

    • About Huw

      "Huw is based in London and covers European regulatory issues and global rulemaking bodies such as the G20, Financial Stability Board, IOSCO, IASB and the Basel Committee. He has covered EU regulation in Brussels, the emergence pan-European stock markets, and has also been a Wall Street reporter in New York."
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