Opinion

Ian Bremmer

Political risk must-reads

Ian Bremmer
Aug 9, 2013 14:31 UTC

Eurasia Group’s weekly selection of essential reading for the political-risk junkie — presented in no particular order. As always, feel free to give us your feedback or selections by tweeting at us via @EurasiaGroup or @ianbremmer.

Must-reads

City chickens and country eggs” – The Economist

China has gone all-in with efforts to spur increased urbanization. Said Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, “Urbanization has the greatest potential for boosting domestic demand.” He claims urban residents in China spent 3.6 times as much as their rural peers in 2010. But what if China has it backwards? Does urbanization lead to growth — or does growth lead to urbanization?

Searching Big Data for ‘Digital Smoke Signals’” – Steve Lohr, New York Times

The United Nations is not always known for entrepreneurialism, innovation, or rapidly adaptive techniques. Could big data change that?

The Great Escape” – Raheem Salman and Ned Parker, Foreign Policy

Abu Ghraib, already cemented as a symbol of an American occupation gone awry, has again become synonymous with the deteriorating situation in Iraq. This time, it was in connection with an enormous prison break that has everyone pointing fingers. July was the deadliest month in Iraq since the end of the civil war in 2008: the UN announced that 1,057 Iraqis were killed.

Political risk must-reads

Ian Bremmer
Aug 2, 2013 15:18 UTC

Eurasia Group’s weekly selection of essential reading for the political-risk junkie — presented in no particular order, and shared from ForeignPolicy.com. As always, feel free to give us your feedback or selections by tweeting at us via @EurasiaGroup or @ianbremmer.

Must-reads 

Chinese Search for Infant Formula Goes Global” – Edward Wong, New York TImes

Are Chinese consumers ready to trust the safety standards of homemade products? Concerned parents in China are registering their doubts with their wallets as they go abroad to purchase baby formula.

Political risk must-reads

Ian Bremmer
Jul 26, 2013 14:56 UTC

Eurasia Group’s weekly selection of essential reading for the political-risk junkie — presented in no particular order, and shared from ForeignPolicy.com. As always, feel free to give us your feedback or selections by tweeting at us via @EurasiaGroup or @ianbremmer.

Must-reads

Back on top” – The Economist

After Japan’s upper-house elections, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has a stable majority in both houses. But will the nationalistic tendencies that have made him so popular at home incense neighbors like China and South Korea even more? 

A hungry world: Lots of food, in too few places” – Mark Koba, CNBC

Of the nearly one billion people who go hungry, approximately 852 million of them live in developing countries. Is the issue that there’s not enough food—or that those who need it most can’t access it?

Political risk must-reads

Ian Bremmer
Jul 19, 2013 19:14 UTC

Eurasia Group’s weekly selection of essential reading for the political-risk junkie — presented in no particular order, and shared from ForeignPolicy.com. As always, feel free to give us your feedback or selections by tweeting at us via @EurasiaGroup or @ianbremmer.

Reshaping the world through trade” – Timothy Garton Ash, Los Angeles Times

Trade deal fever — from TTIP to TPP — is partly a hedge against China’s rise. But that doesn’t mean China shouldn’t be invited. In fact, China’s inclusion should be encouraged…provided it adapts its economic approach to meet the entrance criteria.

Political risk must-reads

Ian Bremmer
Jul 12, 2013 14:57 UTC

Eurasia Group’s weekly selection of essential reading for the political-risk junkie — presented in no particular order, and shared from ForeignPolicy.com. As always, feel free to give us your feedback or selections by tweeting at us via @EurasiaGroup or @ianbremmer.

A Free Miracle Food!” – Nicholas D. Kristof, New York Times

Suboptimal breast-feeding practices claim 804,000 children’s lives a year—more than malaria (based on the World Health Organization’s estimates). This seems like low-hanging fruit for improving the global child mortality rate.

France’s triumphant ‘Joan of Arc’ vows to bring back franc and destroy euro” – Ambrose Evans-Pritchard, The Telegraph

Political risk must-reads

Ian Bremmer
Jun 28, 2013 18:30 UTC

Eurasia Group’s weekly selection of essential reading for the political-risk junkie — presented in no particular order, and shared from ForeignPolicy.com. As always, feel free to give us your feedback or selections by tweeting at us via @EurasiaGroup or @ianbremmer

Must-reads

Spanish frustration with Germany grows as austerity bites” – Tobias Buck, Financial Times

What a difference a year makes. A little more than a year ago, Spaniards dubbed Angela Merkel their most admired leader in Europe. Now she ranks below the leaders of France, Italy and the UK. What’s causing the shift in sentiment?

Political risk must-reads

Ian Bremmer
Jun 21, 2013 17:45 UTC

Eurasia Group’s weekly selection of essential reading for the political-risk junkie — presented in no particular order. As always, feel free to give us your feedback or selections by tweeting at us via @EurasiaGroup or @ianbremmer.

Must-reads

China Court Ruling Could Threaten Foreign Investments in Country” – Sue-Lin Wong, International Herald Tribune

Many Chinese sectors such as media, finance, and technology are off-limits to foreign direct investment. Variable interest entities (VIEs) have allowed Chinese companies such as Baidu, Sina, and Alibaba to raise billions in foreign capital while avoiding the regulatory hurdles. A new court ruling may make these entities illegal—with severe implications.

Political risk must-reads

Ian Bremmer
Jun 14, 2013 15:05 UTC

Eurasia Group’s weekly selection of essential reading for the political-risk junkie — presented in no particular order, and shared from ForeignPolicy.com. As always, feel free to give us your feedback or selections by tweeting at us via @EurasiaGroup or @ianbremmer.

Must-reads 

Africa: Continent of Plenty” – G. Pascal Zachary, IEEE Spectrum

In the early 1960s, Africa supplied 8 percent of the world’s tradable food; that figure has dropped below 2 percent today.  Can Africa feed itself—and even help feed the world?  Here are ten reasons to believe it can.

Putin’s Self-Destruction” – Ivan Krastev and Vladislav Inozemtsev, Foreign Affairs

Political risk must-reads

Ian Bremmer
Jun 7, 2013 19:04 UTC

Eurasia Group’s weekly selection of essential reading for the political risk junkie — presented in no particular order, and shared from ForeignPolicy.com. As always, feel free to give us your feedback or selections by tweeting at us via @EurasiaGroup or @ianbremmer.

Not always with us” – The Economist

How have we made so much progress eradicating poverty in recent decades? Between 1981 and 2010, China lifted 680m people out poverty—more than the entire current population of Latin America. China alone accounted for around three quarters of the world’s total decline in extreme poverty over the past 30 years. Where does progress need to come from going forward?

Cristinanomics: Argentina’s crazy plan to save the economy through money laundering” – Douglas Farah, Foreign Policy

Political risk must-reads

Ian Bremmer
May 24, 2013 15:23 UTC

Eurasia Group’s weekly selection of essential reading for the political risk junkie – presented in no particular order, and shared from ForeignPolicy.com. As always, feel free to give us your feedback or selections by tweeting at us via @EurasiaGroup or @ianbremmer.

 

China’s Entrenched Gender Gap

Leta Hong Fincher, New York Times

The employment rate for urban working-age women in China fell to 60.8 percent in 2010– down from 77.4 percent 20 years earlier—a full 20 percent below the 2010 rate for men. As China continues to urbanize, what does this trend mean? Will educated Chinese women increasingly look abroad for work?

 

Senate Moves Toward Arming the Syrian Rebels

Josh Rogin, The Daily Beast

“The U.S. cannot solve every conflict on the planet,” said Senator Marco Rubio at the Senate Foreign Relations Committee meeting to vote on legislation that would arm elements of the Syrian opposition. But even with no Syrian solution in sight, that didn’t stop him from voting in favor of the bill. Will it pressure President Obama to increase American involvement?

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