Opinion

Ian Bremmer

Political risk must-reads

Ian Bremmer
Mar 11, 2013 18:51 UTC

Eurasia Group’s weekly selection of essential reading for the political risk junkie – presented in no particular order. As always, feel free to give us your feedback or selections by tweeting at us via @EurasiaGroup or @ianbremmer.

The theme of this week’s must-reads is number crunching—whether it’s budgets in China and Iran, record-long filibusters in the US senate, or how much the quality of life has improved in Africa over the last decade. Get out your calculators. Here goes.

Crunching the numbers

Is fracking a ‘bridge’ to a clean-energy future? Ernest Moniz thinks so,” Brad Plumer, Wonkblog, The Washington Post

In terms of halting climate change, natural gas has been dubbed a ‘bridge fuel’ for its growing role in the energy mix as the world transitions to renewable energy. But just how far into the future can this bridge reach?

China is spending more on policing its own people than on its defense budget,” Lily Kuo, Quartz

Political risk must-reads

Ian Bremmer
Mar 1, 2013 20:23 UTC

Eurasia Group’s weekly selection of essential reading for the political risk junkie – presented in no particular order. As always, feel free to give us your feedback or selections @EurasiaGroup or @IanBremmer.

Must-Reads 

How Israel beat the drought” – David Horowitz, The Times of Israel

Israel’s quantity of natural water per capita is the lowest in its entire region. But it seems Israel’s water shortage crisis may be a thing of the past. Why? More than 80 percent of Israel’s purified sewage is reused for agriculture. The next best in the OECD? Spain, at 18 percent.

Germany relaxes immigration rules to attract skilled labour” - Stephen Brown and Holger Hansen, Reuters

Political risk must-reads

Ian Bremmer
Feb 22, 2013 20:38 UTC

Eurasia Group’s weekly selection of essential reading for the political risk junkie – presented in no particular order. As always, feel free to give us your feedback or selections @EurasiaGroup or @IanBremmer.

Must-Reads

China denies it is world’s biggest trader despite data showing it passed US last year

By The Associated Press

With great trading comes great responsibility. For China, the bragging rights of being the world’s #1 trader don’t offset the perceived political obligations that come with it. What will this mean when China becomes the largest economy in the world overall? 

Political risk must-reads

Ian Bremmer
Feb 11, 2013 15:49 UTC

Eurasia Group’s weekly selection of essential reading for the political risk junkie – presented in no particular order. As always, feel free to give us your feedback or selections @EurasiaGroup or @IanBremmer.

U.S. counterterrorism efforts in Africa defined by a decade of missteps

Craig Whitlock, Washington Post

Hindsight is 20-20. In light of recent events in Mali and Algeria, this is an interesting look back on a decade of U.S. counterterrorism in Africa. 

Red Obsessions: Film Business Moves from Hollywood to Asia

Lars-Olva Beier, Spiegel Online

With China slated to replace North America as the world’s #1 film market by 2020, navigating the Chinese market is increasingly difficult – and necessary.

Political risk must-reads

Ian Bremmer
Feb 1, 2013 19:32 UTC

Eurasia Group’s weekly selection of essential reading for the political risk junkie – presented in no particular order. As always, feel free to give us your feedback or selections @EurasiaGroup or @IanBremmer.

China has been all over the news this week, with the New York Times hacking episode dominating headlines. But recent stories related to China venture much further than cyberspace.

Must-reads

The resource race: China dips toes in Arctic waters” – Christoph Seidler, Spiegel Online

Political risk must-reads: Davos edition

Ian Bremmer
Jan 25, 2013 15:50 UTC

Eurasia Group’s weekly selection of essential reading for the political risk junkie – presented in no particular order. As always, feel free to give us your feedback or selections @EurasiaGroup or @IanBremmer.

1.”The confidential list of everyone attending Davos this year

David Yanofsky, Quartz

The first step to assessing Davos and the World Economic Forum is reading up on who attends. Yanofsky answers that question in novel ways — particularly the regional breakdown and analysis. Two-thirds of attendees hail from North America or Europe. Less than 8% come from Africa and South America…combined. This piece seems to take the ‘World’ out of ‘World Economic Forum.’  

2. “Scenarios for the Russian Federation

World Economic Forum

In this report, The World Economic Forum spells out possible long-term challenges that Russia faces. It focuses on three in particular: the “ongoing evolutions in the global energy landscape, the quality of Russia’s domestic institutional environment and dynamics of social cohesion within the country.” Lo and behold, Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev was in Davos– and he responded to the report in his keynote address. Whether he provided any revelatory answers is another story.

Political risk must-reads

Ian Bremmer
Jan 18, 2013 18:58 UTC

Eurasia Group’s weekly selection of essential reading for the political risk junkie – presented in no particular order. As always, feel free to give us your feedback or selections @EurasiaGroup or @IanBremmer.

Must-reads:

Beijing is choking (and can’t hide it anymore)

Avinash Godbole, Institute for Defense Studies and Analyses

The pollution in China’s capital is off the charts; it’s an issue that unites China’s wealthy and poor against the government. What can Beijing do about it? 

Gaffe-prone Merkel rival drags down centre-left as vote looms

Erik Kirschbaum, Reuters

Angela Merkel has done an outstanding job juggling the demands of her constituents and the crisis-riddled eurozone at large. It’s no wonder her approval ratings are sky-high and her reelection prospects are bright.  Opposition candidate Peer Steinbrueck? Not so much. His amusing gaffes make headaches for his party – and life easier for Merkel.  

Political risk must-reads

Ian Bremmer
Jan 11, 2013 15:07 UTC

Eurasia Group’s weekly selection of essential reading for the political risk junkie – presented in no particular order. As always, feel free to give us your feedback or selections @EurasiaGroup or @IanBremmer.

Must-Reads

1. “The New Power Map: World Politics After the Boom in Unconventional Energy,” Aviezer Tucker, Foreign Affairs

Unconventional energy plays in North America are fundamentally changing energy markets – and, therefore, international politics. Instead of focusing on the good news for the US and Canada, Tucker makes a compelling case that Russia is in big trouble.

Political risk must-reads

Ian Bremmer
Dec 21, 2012 20:55 UTC

Eurasia Group is posting our favorite political risk articles of the week on Foreign Policy, which I’d like to share here as well.  As always, feel free to give us your feedback or selections @EurasiaGroup or @IanBremmer. This is being reprinted from ForeignPolicy.com.

Must-Reads

1. “South Korea’s Presidential Election: A Homecoming”

Banyan Asia blog, The Economist

On Wednesday, Park Geun-hye was named president of South Korea by a small margin, making her the first woman to hold the post in the nation’s history. How will her presidency differ from Lee Myung-bak’s? What are the implications for North-South relations?

2. “The Importance of Shinzo Abe”

Sanjaya Baru, The Hindu

A much more momentous Asian election took place this past weekend, as Shinzo Abe and the LDP returned to power. Many are focusing on the possible conflicts that the election could provoke between China and Japan, but this piece asks: Are Japan and India the “natural partners in Asia?” In light of the conflict over the Senkaku/Diaoyu islands, it seems Japan is pursuing an ABC policy (Anybody But China). Why not India?

Political risk must-reads

Ian Bremmer
Dec 14, 2012 20:39 UTC

Eurasia Group just started posting our favorite political risk articles of the week on Foreign Policy, which I’d like to share here as well.  As always, feel free to give us your feedback or selections @EurasiaGroup or @IanBremmer. This is being reprinted from ForeignPolicy.com.

Must-Reads

1. “Why the Reset Should Be Reset
Thomas E. Graham and Dmitri Trenin, New York Times

In light of Vladimir Putin’s State of the Union address on Wednesday, a speech which signaled more of the same on the home front, it’s worth tracking the shifting dynamic between Russia and the United States. With relations deteriorating, is a grander “longer-term strategic framework” out of the question?

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