Expert Zone

Straight from the Specialists

Bashing China won’t fix U.S. economy

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(The views expressed in this column are the author’s own and do not represent those of Reuters)

Both ends of the political spectrum seem to be competing to be tougher on China economic issues. They’re both wrong.

Chinese policy does warp the global economy in a number of ways, but 99 percent of our current problems are of our own making. Bashing China feels good but accomplishes nothing.

U.S. President Obama has announced a new World Trade Organisation case against China. This is another in a series of steps featuring the new bureaucracy added last winter. Some of these are minor in impact; others are outright harmful.

The rare earths distraction

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(The views expressed in this column are the author’s own and do not represent those of Reuters)

The U.S., EU and Japan are suing China in the World Trade Organisation (WTO), calling Chinese export quotas on rare earth elements an illegal trade practice.

U.S. debt and China

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(The views expressed in this column are the author’s own and do not represent those of Reuters)

The U.S. Department of the Treasury has released an initial estimate of foreign holdings of U.S. securities, including Treasury bonds, as of June 30, 2011. This estimate serves as a correction of monthly figures Treasury publishes, known as the Major Foreign Holders series.

Market reform in China: Should we believe it?

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(The views expressed in this column are the author’s own and do not represent those of Reuters)

The first step in solving a problem is admitting it. For years, the Chinese government and their defenders overseas insisted first that China was still reforming, then that state-led economic development was superior to market-led development. Evidence to the contrary came as news to many.

The limits of the Pakistan-China alliance

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(The views expressed in this column are the authors’ own and do not represent those of Reuters)

By Lisa Curtis and Derek Scissors

In the wake of the U.S. raid on Osama bin Laden’s compound last May and deteriorating relations between Islamabad and Washington, Pakistani leaders have sought to play up their country’s relations with China, touting Beijing as an alternative partner to Washington. However, China’s concerns about the future stability and development of Pakistan will limit the extent to which China will bail Pakistan out of its current economic difficulties, and the degree to which China will seek to drive a wedge between Islamabad and Washington.

Global Economics: When China is not just China

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(The views expressed in this column are the author’s own and do not represent those of Reuters)

The People’s Republic of China’s (PRC’s) relationship with Iran receives a good deal of attention. As the U.S. considers how to stop Iran’s nuclear weapons program short of military action, the PRC is considered vital in ensuring economic sanctions are effective. But it has been difficult to win Chinese cooperation in applying sanctions. One mistake the U.S. may have made is treating China as a unified entity.

China’s economic data (still) not credible

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(The views expressed in this column are the author’s own and do not represent those of Reuters)

China today announced that GDP growth for 2011 slowed to 9.2 pct. Over the coming days and weeks, there will be a stream of pontificating about what this means. There’s a good chance that everyone involved will be pontificating about nonsense.

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