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Reflections from Davos

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(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

It’s been an exciting week at Davos. The annual meeting of the World Economic Forum this year was refreshingly different from previous editions. There is a general sense of optimism.

Although the effects of the recent crisis linger on, businesses and business leaders are acknowledging that we are seeing signs of recovery. In Davos, I had conversations with business leaders, heads of industry bodies, as also members of the academic and media fraternity. Each of these conversations resonated optimism.

(Pictures: World Economic Forum)

I also saw a few themes and points of view being discussed frequently, not only in my own conversations but also in several sessions at Davos. The most popular one was of the relevance of the theme of the annual meeting.

Everyone seemed to agree that the need of the hour is to reshape the world to ensure that every individual has equal access to an acceptable standard of living. The world of extremes in which we live today is not a sustainable one. The ever-increasing gap between the haves and the have-nots is unacceptable. More importantly, it is not conducive for socio-economic progress.

Leveraging the digital revolution

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

We live in an age where emerging technologies are narrowing the divide between humans and machines. As features of mobile phones become more customized and complex, they cease to be just devices of communication. Mobile phones now store more personal information than ever before. They are increasingly being perceived as personalized devices that enhance our lives.

We are also living in times when remote robotic surgeries and online classrooms are transforming healthcare and education in ways never imagined before. We are truly living in a digital age.

Insurance industry players go online — reluctantly

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(The views expressed in this column are the author’s own and do not represent those of Reuters)

From the year 2000 onwards, the Indian insurance industry saw a number of private players entering through the gates thrown open by the government. Public sector player LIC had already gained an edge by being a pioneer in the life insurance space. With an army of agents, LIC was way ahead of these latecomers and found itself settled comfortably.

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