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The Modi view on security issues

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(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

A Sadhu or a Hindu holyman wears a badge with an image of Hindu nationalist Narendra Modi, prime ministerial candidate for India's main opposition Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), outside an ashram in Ayodhya, Uttar Pradesh May 6, 2014. REUTERS/Anindito MukherjeeResults of the five-week general election will be announced on May 16, with the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) led by Narendra Modi favoured to win.

Thus Modi’s views on major security and strategic issues facing India acquire greater salience.

The election has been marked by bitter debates and allegations and counter-allegations on television and at public rallies. Consequently, certain assertive references have been attributed to Modi, and some of his comments have elicited sharp responses both within India and in the countries mentioned – like Pakistan and China.

However, in his interviews to the print media and news agencies, Modi’s views are more calibrated and can be characterized as being a continuation of the Vajpayee formulations during the NDA regime.

Steps the next government should take

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(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

India’s economy is tottering, inflation is too high and growth too low. The Congress-led UPA government allowed the economy to drift during its second term. Why? Because it did not focus on real issues, failed to govern effectively and did not carry out any significant reforms.

New legislation became almost impossible, with coalition partners such as the TMC and DMK threatening to pull out (and they eventually did). On top of that, successive scams made it impossible for the government to function normally.

India’s democratic pageant

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(This piece comes from Project Syndicate. The opinions expressed are the author’s own)

Last week, India’s independent Election Commission announced the dates for the next general election. The world’s largest single exercise of the democratic franchise will take place over a staggering 37 days in nine “phases,” some a week apart, from April 7 to May 12. Some 814 million eligible voters will elect, for the 16th time, a new parliament and government, casting their ballots at more than 930,000 polling stations — after choosing from an estimated 15,000 candidates belonging to more than 500 political parties.

India’s disrupted democracy

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(This piece comes from Project Syndicate. The opinions expressed are the author’s own)

India’s 15th Lok Sabha (the lower house of Parliament) passed into history ignominiously this month, following the least productive five years of any Indian parliament in six decades of functioning democracy. With entire sessions lost to opposition disruptions, and with frequent adjournments depriving legislators of time for deliberation, the MPs elected in May 2009 passed fewer bills and spent fewer hours in debate than any of their predecessors.

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