Expert Zone

Straight from the Specialists

How high will the Sensex go?

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(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

A bronze bull sculpture is seen as an employee walks out of the Bombay Stock Exchange building in MumbaiSince April, the stock market has been in a frenzy after a long period of utter gloom. In quick succession, the Sensex jumped month after month to cross 26,000 on July 7. This was not mere euphoria created by the election of the Narendra Modi government, with a single-party majority in the Lok Sabha after a long time.

The market had to make up a lot for lost time. In the last three years of the Congress-led government, the Sensex lost 6 percent. Even if the Sensex had risen at the same pace as the rate of interest, it would have crossed 26,000 last year. The build-up of investor confidence by Modi during the campaign, and subsequently after the election, was instrumental in reversing and accelerating the lethargic pace of the Sensex.

In four months, the Sensex climbed 16 percent. What is amazing is a fifth of that jump was accomplished in a single day on May 13.

Indian markets: Earnings in focus, better to stick to fundamentals

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(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

It’s reasonable to ask whether the Indian stock market has lost steam after the blistering run-up seen over the past couple of months. Since August, the markets have rallied about 40 percent, with many stocks in high-beta sectors such as infrastructure generating a return of more than 100 percent. At a one-year forward price-to-earnings (P/E) multiple of 15x, the Nifty isn’t exactly cheap for retail investors right now.

The Narendra Modi-led government, which contested and won the elections on the development plank, is expected to push for reforms in no time, taking on knotty issues related to taxation and infrastructure.

India Market Weekahead: Time to take some profits off the table

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A rally of hope tempered by caution pushed the Nifty 1.2 percent up to 6,776 for the week. Investors believe the worst is over and a new government would be the catalyst for a sustained economic upturn. In election season, hope for a better tomorrow helps the market ignore ground realities.

A record turnout in the ongoing general election is being seen as an anti-incumbency vote. As the market continues moving up, investor hopes for a stable government get priced in, leaving hardly any room for a disappointment. On the other hand, fence sitters who got left out of the rally will join the fray, adding to the momentum already built by investors.

India Markets Weekahead: Markets back on track for pre-election rally

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The week started on a sombre note but with institutional activity picking up, the Nifty closed with gains of 1.97 percent at 6276 despite a mid-week trading holiday. Political activity also gained momentum with 11 parties coming together to form a Third Front to oppose both national parties.

 

The Election Commission may announce election dates in the coming week — the code of conduct coming in will halt any policy decisions.

India Markets Weekahead: It’s time again for an election year ‘rally of hope’

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Despite a volatile Friday, it was a good week for the markets and saw the Nifty close about 90 points higher at 6,261, with sentiment supported by better-than-expected quarterly results and benign inflation data.

The few earnings that disappointed investors seemed to affect specific stocks without having a bearing on either the sector or the markets.

Indian hedge funds get knocked down but get up again

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The fortunes of hedge funds focused on India continue to twist and turn, with many plots and subplots. After witnessing widespread losses and heavy redemptions in 2008, Indian hedge fund managers bounced back remarkably to post a 50 percent return in 2009. They continued their good form in 2010, delivering healthy gains of 12 percent during the year.

But in 2011, the managers witnessed losses amid declining markets and a depreciating rupee. At the end of that year, many managers expressed confidence in the underlying market for the following year and predicted gains for the rupee by mid-2012 — both these predictions came to pass. The Eurekahedge Indian Hedge Fund Index was up 13.13 percent in 2012, making it the strongest regional hedge fund mandate for the year. Some of the funds even witnessed asset inflows in 2012 and early 2013, a rarity for Indian hedge funds since the financial crisis.

Not a smooth ride for the markets

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There was subdued excitement over the Sensex hitting a record high in a special trading session on Diwali. It had taken the market quite some time to cross its previous peak in 2008. This was also the case for most other markets, although they had recovered a little earlier.

The Indian market was slow to catch up because, apart from the international conditions, there were domestic problems that affected the health of the economy.

Focus should be inflation, not just stemming rupee’s fall

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Indian stocks have been battered over the past few sessions. The market condition is not unexpected, thanks to over-action by policymakers and over-reaction by stock investors.

The apparent anxiety on the part of the government was that even if the fall of the rupee was inevitable, left entirely to the market, speculative activity would push the economy into a crisis. Presumably, the rupee at 60 to the dollar was the benchmark for intervention.

India Market Weekahead – Inflation, FII inflows to be key

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

The bulls are back and their four-week winning streak saw the Nifty close at a 29-month high of 6107 on Friday, up about 2.75 percent for the week. Liquidity flows remain robust, fuelling the momentum despite political heat in New Delhi.

The Congress win in Karnataka boosted positive sentiment, followed by industrial output data that was marginally better than expectations. The overall earnings season has been favourable and along with the global rally provided the right environment for the markets to cross the psychological barrier of 6100 in the Nifty and 20000 on the Sensex. The only thing missing is euphoria on the street and broader participation by investors.

Markets Weekahead: Not the right time to buy

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The markets continued their winning streak in the past week, with the Nifty gaining another 1.52 percent to close at 5871 on Friday.

The yen impact helped Maruti surprise even the most optimistic earnings estimates and its stocks jumped 5 percent to close at a lifetime high of 1673 rupees. The company seems richly valued and does not take into account the slowdown which we may encounter over the next few months.

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