India Insight

Is New Delhi working on Kashmir solution?

August 30, 2010

At least 64 people have been killed across Kashmir during anti-India demonstrations, one of the worst outbreaks of unrest since a separatist revolt against New Delhi broke out in 1989.

A Kashmiri protester throws a stone towards police during an anti-India protest in Srinagar August 30, 2010. REUTERS/Danish IsmailFrequent curfews, security lockdown and separatist strikes have kept the Muslim-majority Kashmir valley on the boil, shutting down much of the region for the past two and a half months.

New Delhi has been criticised for failing to respond to violence that has wounded hundreds, closed down schools and colleges also.

But now Kashmir’s chief minister, Omar Abdullah, has hinted at a political solution of the crisis by New Delhi in the coming days.

“The Union government is actively working for a political solution,” Abdullah said and expressed hope that an “amicable and peaceful” settlement would not be too far off.

After several failed rounds of peace talks between separatists and the Centre in the past two decades, India will find it difficult bridging the “trust deficit” between New  Delhi and Kashmir, a region seen as key to the stability of a broad zone ranging from India to Afghanistan.

Abdullah expressed hope that New Delhi will take positive steps in addressing the political issues of Kashmir in a sustained dialogue process avoiding the “re-occurrence of mistakes done in the past.”

“Kashmir issue has political genesis and it has originated with the independence of India and the birth of Pakistan. The over 60-year-old problem has become a complex one and requires sustained political efforts by all the stakeholders  through a dialogue process to resolve it as per the aspirations of the people of the state,” Abdullah added.

Sentiment against New Delhi’s rule runs deep in the disputed Kashmir region, which is claimed both by India and Pakistan.

Kashmiri separatists want to carve out an independent homeland or merge with predominantly Muslim Pakistan.

But New Delhi sees Kashmir as an integral part of India, key to highlighting the secular nature of the Hindu-majority nation.

Is New Delhi ready for a political solution to end the decades-old dispute over Kashmir that may encourage further demands for independence from other states, especially in its northeast region near China?

Comments
8 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

new delhi is confused, how to handle the situation in kashmir, specially when all the measures have failed now they came up with the idea of political autonomy. they are discussing it since past many years but it was never restored. its not the time to make people fool around the world, it is a high time to give this dispute a proper resolution other wise time is not far when china will claim its stake in kashmir as well.
india is not actually ready to resolve it but the pressure that is building due to the resistance of the people in Kashmir is attracting the attention of the whole world, which makes India answerable to the world community, thats why the top officials are saying that there is some thing good on cards for the people of kashmir.how ever india is unpredictable specially when it comes to resolution of Kashmir:
i agree india also has this as a biggest fear, if they grant Kashmir independence, there are many other states that may demand the same, and india will end up divided into parts like USSR.

Posted by littlemiss | Report as abusive
 

By talking about a political solution to kashmir India has been hoodwinking world community and actually buying time. But now Kashmir is at the point of no return, i am sure india has come under a strong pressure this time after killing 66 people including women and children. But as long as kashmir is completely free both from india and pakistan people of kashmir will continue thier peaceful struggle.

Posted by drshugufta | Report as abusive
 

Independent Kashmir

The difficulty of adopting this as a potential solution is that it requires India and Pakistan to give up territory, which they are not willing to do. Any plebiscite or referendum likely to result in a majority vote for independence would therefore probably be opposed by both India and Pakistan. It would also be rejected by the inhabitants of the state who are content with their status as part of the countries to which they already owe allegiance.

Posted by Imititaz | Report as abusive
 

Kashmir joins India

Such a solution would be unlikely to bring stability to the region as the Muslim inhabitants of Pakistani-administered Jammu and Kashmir, including the Northern Areas, have never shown any desire to become part of India.

Posted by Imititaz | Report as abusive
 

Kashmir joins Pakistan

Pakistan has consistently favoured this as the best solution to the dispute. In view of the state’s majority Muslim population, it believes that it would vote to become part of Pakistan. However a single plebiscite held in a region which comprises peoples that are culturally, religiously and ethnically diverse, would create disaffected minorities. The Hindus of Jammu, and the Buddhists of Ladakh have never shown any desire to join Pakistan and would protest at the outcome.

Posted by Imititaz | Report as abusive
 

and The status quo

Kashmir has been a flashpoint between India and Pakistan for more than 50 years. Currently a boundary – the Line of Control – divides the region in two, with one part administered by India and one by Pakistan. India would like to formalise this status quo and make it the accepted international boundary. But Pakistan and Kashmiri activists reject this plan because they both want greater control over the region.

Posted by Imititaz | Report as abusive
 

First and Final Demand of Kashmiris…..WE WANT FREEDOM from the cruel clenches of so called biggest Democracy of the World…..

Posted by shahdegreat | Report as abusive
 

i doubt if India is really serious about resolution as there is no leader of that caliber who would take risks involved in such resolution as politics of India at this time is not statesmanship oriented…..but let us watch what India is going to offer????????

Posted by walee | Report as abusive
 

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