India Insight

ISI certified, but failing to live up to standard?

October 14, 2011

Go to any market and you will find many products ranging from cosmetics to food and heavy industrial materials sport ISI or ISO certification tags, indicating that they are safe for use and assure a certain level of quality.

Even cheap toys from wholesale markets, which on face value alone look like brittle recycled plastic, can be seen with a ‘quality’ tag, giving one a feeling that the mark is being easily used and abused by unscrupulous manufacturers.

On Friday, Food Minister K.V. Thomas indicated that some Indian companies may be churning out sub-standard products despite displaying the quality tags.

“We are getting a lot of complaints regarding the quality of tyres which have got these ISO markings,” Thomas said.

ISI is a quality tag issued by the national standards body, the Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS), while ISO tags are standards prescribed by the International Organization for Standardization, of which India is a founding member.

The minister also displayed apprehension about the ability of the BIS to ensure quality in industries like jewellery by issuing the quality mark.

Responding to questions on the bullion industry’s demand for mandatory hallmarking of jewellery for ensuring quality, Thomas said: “I feel there should be some authenticity for this hallmarking”.

Thomas, who was attending a function to mark World Standards Day, urged Indian manufacturers and exporters to adhere to national and international standards so that the “national image and commercial interests are enhanced overseas”.

But while the minister was urging Indian manufacturers to “comply fully to prescribed standards and regulations”, a large computer projection displayed on both sides of the dais had a pop-up which said “Windows not genuine”.

Talk about irony.

Comments
6 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

The quality of products are already falling down! Need for revising the benchmarks. material handling equipments

Posted by Ashok007 | Report as abusive
 

ISI certification in India is something that is unable to guarantee any kind of quality assurance. If you think that ISI mark is enough to tell about the quality of the products, then you need to rethink. There are more chances that you will some defective products in many cases. There is need to enforce proper certification of ISI in India.

Posted by MoneyVarta | Report as abusive
 

Lack of transparent policy to provide ISI or ISO in INDIA is phenomenally CORRUPT…and getting worse day by day. Every part of the money spent as bribe to get certified is distributed so that every complaint just disappears as reported.

Posted by episcan | Report as abusive
 

There seems to be no clarity about ISO certification and ISI certification. ISO 9001 certification is a System certification nothing to do with product quality, where as ISI certification is the product certification ensuring product quality.
So if a product does not meet quality standards and it is having ISI mark, blame ISI and not ISO!

Posted by 1sharmila | Report as abusive
 

Certification has become an industry where people only care revenue and any investment is sustain quality check is not revenue generating.

Aryan N.
http://www.niyukti.in

Posted by AryanN | Report as abusive
 

Brand name and quality tag give confidence to buyers, whateber be the commodity. We see brand names widely publicised in print media and vid media too but there have not been adequate checking by certification authorities once the product has been certified by them. These certifications need a limit of time period whereafter the manufacturers/producers go through the certification process with more stringent parametres, since technology is fast changing in every field with state-of-art being available throughout the world.

Posted by NagarajaM | Report as abusive
 

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