India Insight

PETA offers Kingfisher a vegan lift

May 3, 2012

One of the many benefits of vegetarianism, so animal rights activists say, is that it cures impotence. To that end, the global rights group PETA is offering a way to give flagging Kingfisher Airlines a lift.

The airline, once the flashiest in the Indian aviation industry with well-groomed hostesses and gourmet food, is struggling to stay upright after running up a debt of about $1.3 billion. It has been wooing investors, pleading with banks and sounding out anyone who could help.

Now, help is being offered from an unlikely quarter.

PETA has made a “tempting offer to help keep Kingfisher Airlines out of its financial crisis and flying sky-high”, the group said in a statement. Condition: The airline — whose advertisements once featured tastefully served lobsters and baked chicken — covers its planes with anti-non-vegetarianism slogans.

Want Good Times? Go Vegan. Meat Consumption Leads to Impotence,” the slogans would say if Kingfisher accepts the proposal.

Impotence affects more than half of India’s males aged over 40, and this condition can be “prevented or even reversed” with a pure vegetarian diet, PETA says.

It’s certainly an innovative form of promoting PETA’s case, which “operates under the simple principle that animals are not ours to eat, wear, experiment on or use for entertainment.”

It was not clear whether Kingfisher’s owner, the flamboyant liquor baron Vijay Mallya — the “King of Good Times” — will agree to the proposal, and how much money PETA has proposed to pay.

“We can assure you that more than just Kingfisher’s jets will be ‘taking off’ if Dr Mallya accepts PETA’s offer and spreads this vital message about meat and impotence,” PETA says.

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