Movie Review: Sulemani Keeda

December 5, 2014

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

Sulemani Keeda“Sulemani Keeda”, a slacker comedy about two struggling writers in Bollywood, seems like an inside joke that only a few people are let in on. Produced on a shoe-string budget, it almost seems like the director is describing his own struggling days through the film. And while it might be an engaging story, most people may not be able to relate to it.

The jokes, the conversations laced with profanity, and the relentless waiting outside producers’ offices, hoping they will give your story a chance, is all too familiar to those who are struggling to enter Bollywood. But it is a story that will resonate only to this very small group of people.

Amit Masurkar’s story is insular, and thus loses its charm half-way through the film. Mayank Tewari and Naveen Kasturia are appropriately deadpan as a pair of writers who are ambling through life as they wait for that one script that will be greenlit.

Sulemani KeedaThe situations in the film are borderline funny, and the dialogue, by Masurkar, is caustic and witty. Aditi Vasudev as free-spirited lawyer Ruma has a lovely screen presence, and her effervescence lends much to the film.

At 88 minutes, Sulemani Keeda (Hindi street slang for “pain in the ass”) doesn’t feel laborious, but it also doesn’t make any profound or memorable points. Just like its characters, it ambles along towards some sort of a conclusion. Along the way, it makes you laugh, but that is about all it achieves.

(Editing by Robert MacMillan; Follow Shilpa on Twitter at @shilpajay and Robert @bobbymacReports | This article is website-exclusive and cannot be reproduced without permission)

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