Photo Gallery – In winter, Delhi indulges in pan-India eats

December 31, 2014

India is a difficult place to shoot, with too many people walking in and out of your frame all the time, a foreign photojournalist once told me as we sat down to review my pictures.

I didn’t quite get the full import of what he meant until I spent a weekend at Delhi’s food festivals.

The scene at ‘Dilli ke Pakwaan’, the city’s local food festival, wasn’t entirely different from a big fat Indian wedding, where guests usually work themselves up into a culinary frenzy. In such circumstances, it is no mean task for a photographer to go about his or her business, even if it means sneaking through the rear of stalls to take pictures.

The fifth edition of the event, which ended on Tuesday, offered 60 sweet, greasy and spicy dishes from Delhi’s streets. Old Delhi’s “Changezi Chicken” was one the most sought-after kiosks, with its array of North Indian Mughlai curries. I, however, settled for bhel puri and a dry fruit kulfi.

But the National Street Food Festival, hosting vendors from over 20 Indian states, far outnumbered the local festival in terms of visitors and food items.

While kebabs and Punjabi meat curries whetted appetites for many a Delhi resident, Bihar’s litti chokha – including the mutton ones – turned out to be a popular eat. I had my hunger sated in khoya jalebi from Madhya Pradesh and Mysore pak – a sweet prepared in butter – that seemed to go well with filter coffee.

The festival, now in its sixth year, ended on Sunday.

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(Editing by Robert MacMillan. Follow him on Twitter @bobbymacReports and Ankush @Ankush_patrakar | This article is website-exclusive and cannot be reproduced without permission.)

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