Movie Review: Wedding Pullav

October 16, 2015

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

Binod Pradhan
‘s “Wedding Pullav” is a romantic comedy featuring one of the classic tropes of the genre – the best friends who aren’t sure they are in love until a rival appears on the scene. Despite the tried and tested theme, “Wedding Pullav” is insipid and uninspiring in every frame.

Director Pradhan milks every cliché, including the tomboyish heroine who morphs into a svelte, feminine woman; the escape from the mandap (wedding pavilion); and the older, wiser man who sets their affairs right. But even a cliché, if executed well, can create magic. There is nothing magical about the 123 minutes of “Wedding Pullav”.

Anushka and Adi are the confused pair in question – engaged to be married, at the same time and at the same venue, but to different people. They realize they might just be in love, but given that they share absolutely no chemistry, it does seem a bit of a stretch.

The lead actors – debutante Anushka and Diganth – stutter through their performances, and a coterie of character actors mouth mindless lines and act out ridiculous situations as if they are sleepwalking. Rishi Kapoor makes a fleeting appearance as a benevolent stranger, but he seems out of sorts in a screenplay as hackneyed as this one.

With its bad jokes and mediocre dialogue, this pullav – to use another cliché – is unpalatable.

(Editing by Tony Tharakan; follow Shilpa on Twitter @shilpajay, and Tony @tonytharakanThis article is website-exclusive and cannot be reproduced without permission)

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