India Insight

A Minute with Vijay Krishna Acharya on “Dhoom 3”

Vijay Krishna Acharya wrote all three films in India’s only action franchise – the Dhoom films, and directed the latest one. Fashioned as slick action thrillers in the mold of “Ocean’s 11” or “The Fast and the Furious”, the films always star an intelligent thief – an anti-hero who is too smart to be caught.

Opening this weekend to record-breaking ticket prices (three times the normal amount of a multiplex ticket), “Dhoom 3″ features Aamir Khan as a bank robber. Acharya, 45, spoke to Reuters about the film, why he wanted to shoot it in Imax, and what it takes to write a good anti-hero.

Why did you want to shoot “Dhoom 3” in Imax?

I have been a keen watcher of Imax films abroad, and always thought that we should experiment with the format. With this film, I had the sets, the locations and the story that lent itself to this kind of treatment. The audience that is discerning, and has been exposed to such films in the past, will definitely appreciate the IMAX experience.

Your films make a hero out of the bad guy. Why is that?

It happened like that. You make a film, and that film takes a life of its own. But the good guys – Abhishek (Bachchan) and Uday’s (Chopra) characters also have an important place in the franchise. They define the equilibrium in society – you cannot say that illegal activities and a life of crime are fashionable or glamorous. But I have to say, there is some joy and more rationale in the story of the pursuit of the intelligent criminal. That’s part of the visceral appeal of the films.

As a writer, what does it take to create an anti-hero who is essentially the driver of your story?

The Unique Identity number — putting all eggs in one basket?

There was a television ad some time back where a village leader played by Bollywood actor Abhishek Bachchan cutely decrees that feuding villagers would be known by their mobile numbers rather than names denoting caste or community.

It’s an idea that no longer seems far-fetched.

This week, the finance minister allocated 1200 million rupees to  the Unique Identification Authority of India, headed by former Infosys chief Nandan Nilekani.

The project provides a unique identity number, something like the U.S. social security number, to India’s billion-plus citizens.

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