The crime was horrific, the case shocking, and the trial long. Yet when the much anticipated first verdict in the high-profile Delhi gang rape case was pronounced in India over the weekend, there was no jubilation, just outrage.

Found guilty of the gang rape and murder of a student on a bus in December, the teenager - one of six accused - was sentenced to three years in a juvenile home, sparking anger and debate over whether India is too soft on its young offenders. Four adult defendants are on trial in a separate fast-track court. One of the accused committed suicide in jail.

The first reaction came from the parents of the dead 23-year-old student, who was beaten, tortured with an iron rod and raped on the night of Dec. 16 before being dumped on a roadside in the capital.

"It is a crime to be born a girl in this country," the victim’s mother said after hearing the verdict. "How will I live knowing that the killers of my daughter are still alive?"

Her dissatisfaction has been echoed in many quarters.

From public protests to televised debates with lawyers, activists and politicians, and the Twittersphere, many Indians have felt a sense of injustice over the case, which put a global spotlight on violence against women in India.