India Insight

Delhi rape victim’s parents hold firm in desire for death penalty

The family of the trainee physiotherapist who was gang-raped in Delhi last December received a new house and 3.5 million rupees (about $54,000) in compensation for their daughter’s torture and death. It’s a bounty they would rather forgo. They want their daughter’s killers dead.

“Earlier, we used to be happy with whatever little we earned,” the victim’s mother told Reuters in an interview on Sunday. “The difference now is that despite having everything, our eyes are wet all the time.”

“When we go out and see other girls smile and giggle, we think our daughter would have also smiled like this, giggled like this; those would have been such wonderful moments. It pains us deeply when we think about that,” said the victim’s father.

The family lives in a three-bedroom apartment in a middle-class suburb. One of the victim’s brothers is enrolled in an elite school; the other has been offered a job in the railways.

The apartment, a gift from the central government, feels forlorn. The family has a washing machine, a television set and some beds. A couple of plastic chairs occupy the living room. A divan sits in one of the empty bedrooms.

Women still feel unsafe in India’s rape capital

Assurances from the police and a new anti-rape law have done little to make the streets of New Delhi safer for women, especially for those using public transport, interviews conducted by the Reuters India Insight team show.

The December incident, in which a 23-year-old trainee physiotherapist died two weeks after she was gang-raped in a moving bus, raised questions over women’s safety in India and sparked debate over how men treat women all over the country.

A teenager has been sentenced to three years in juvenile detention and a court is expected to announce its verdict on the four adults accused of the crime on Tuesday. (Update: Four men convicted and sentenced to death)

Women and New Delhi: the views of travellers

By Aditya Kalra and Anuja Jaiman

Assurances from the police and a new anti-rape law have done little to make the streets of New Delhi safer for women, especially for those using public transport, interviews conducted by the India Insight team show.

The India Insight team travelled in Delhi Transport Corporation (DTC) buses and Delhi Metro trains and spoke to commuters.

Here are edited excerpts from conversations:

Farhana Ahmed, 22, student; travelling in a bus
I only feel safe travelling by bus in the day time because it’s crowded and there are less chances of being in trouble. I prefer not to board a bus after five in the evening. Whenever we go out after 9 p.m., we have experienced eve-teasing. I think it’s better not to wear dresses at night.

Timeline of events: The Delhi gang rape case

In December last year, a 23-year-old trainee physiotherapist died two weeks after she was gang-raped and mutilated in a moving bus in Delhi, raising questions over women’s safety in the capital and sparking debates over their treatment in India.

Here is a timeline of key events in the case:

December 16:  A 23-year-old trainee physiotherapist is beaten, raped for almost an hour and thrown out of a moving bus in New Delhi by six people. Her male friend, a software engineer, is beaten with a metal rod.

December 17-22: The woman remains in Delhi’s Safdarjung Hospital. Police arrest suspects. Hundreds of students and activists block roads in Delhi and march to the president’s palace, breaking through police barricades. Police use batons, tear gas and water cannon to turn back protestors, who demand the death penalty for the accused and safety assurances for women.

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