India Insight

Tata Power scouts for opportunities abroad

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not necessarily of Reuters)

Tata Power Company Ltd, part of the salt-to-steel Tata conglomerate, is India’s largest integrated power producer. It aims to generate some 20,000 MW by 2020, up from more than 8500 MW now, and is scouting for opportunities abroad as well as building its thermal and renewables business at home.

Like its peers in the industry, the company has faced problems of land acquisition and fuel supply shortages in developing new projects, projects that are seen as key to help revive India’s flagging economy and fix blackouts.

Moreover, its plant at Mundra in Gujarat has been hit by a jump in the cost of imported coal, and Tata is still waiting for a decision in April by India’s power regulator, the Central Electricity Regulatory Commission (CERC), to come in to force to allow it to raise tariffs to existing customers.

(Related blog: Counting the cost of India’s power cuts http://r.reuters.com/pep48t )

Counting the cost of India’s blackouts

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not necessarily of Reuters)

Is it better to pay more money for more electricity, or keep prices low and look forward to blackouts that will conk out offices, factories and homes in India? That is the question that lies at the heart of an ongoing debate about whether authorities should allow utilities Adani Power Ltd and Tata Power Co Ltd to raise their tariffs on existing contracts to clients, to compensate the companies for the domestic coal supply shortages and the rising cost of buying coal from overseas.

Much of it a relic from before the 1991 economic reforms that kick-started the India growth story, the country’s infrastructure is screaming out for more investment to fix pot-holed roads, modernise the railway network and build more power plants. But unable to match the spending power that the likes of China have, the Indian government has turned to the private sector to fund much of the new infrastructure it needs. Indian politicians must therefore strike a balance between allowing the private sector to make money, while at the same time protecting the interests of customers (and voters) in a country where hundreds of millions live below the poverty line.

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