Acid Factory: Heartburn best avoided

October 9, 2009

Most films have one distinguishing characteristic — maybe the music, the animation, perhaps the running time or a huge budget.

Suparn Varma’s “Acid Factory”, which releases in cinemas this week has a unique feature — that of having the biggest ensemble of bad actors on a single screen.
 
Fardeen Khan, Aftab Shivdasani, Dino Morea, Dia Mirza, Danny Denzongpa and even the usually dependable Manoj Bajpai put in such atrociously bad performances that you wonder how they got away with it.
 
In spite of an interesting storyline and a reasonable screen time, you are never hooked to the events on screen, and even during the climax of the film, I was tempted to whip out my mobile and recheck my messages for the day — they would have provided far more entertainment.
 
Fardeen Khan plays Romeo, a cop who has “applied for an undercover assignment” (didn’t know that happened) to uncover dreaded don Kaiser (Irrfan Khan).

Five weeks later, he finds himself in an abandoned acid factory with four other men and no memory of the events that brought him there.
 
The film is told in flashback but the story is told so shoddily and the performances, as I said before, are so unconvincing that you cannot wait for this ordeal to be over and to bolt out of the theatre.
 
The worst of the lot is Gulshan Grover, who plays the dumbest policeman in celluloid history, and every time Irrfan Khan outsmarts him, he goes about saying “very smart” to a bewildered foreign extra.
 
If you want to save yourself heartburn in the middle of the festival season, do yourself a favour and avoid this disaster.

2 comments

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Shilpa Jamkhandikar’s merciless broadside would have commanded a lot more credibility, if she had subjected each department of the film to a more impartial review. Though at one point she describes its story as interesting, she has termed as bad almost every actor who has toed the storyline. An actor cannot be bad, though an acting can. Besides, actors are bound by the story and cannot be blamed for its deficiencies. Whether the actors have done justice to the story, is the vital question to be answered. Her disapproval of its story has darkened her view of the other aspects of the film. Her review fails to mention any good aspect of the film and is one of the harshest I have come across in recent times. And therefore, its reliability is doubtful. Regards. Sunil M S from North Parur

Posted by Sunil M S | Report as abusive

Hey Sunil, I had a small query. Did YOU watch the movie?

“In spite of an interesting storyline and a reasonable screen time, you are never hooked to the events on screen, and even during the climax of the film, I was tempted to whip out my mobile and recheck my messages for the day — they would have provided far more entertainment.”

It’s a review, not an effort to pander to either the producer or the stars. I think she calls it like she sees it. And, I like that. At least, she does not give 3 and 4 stars and put your two hundred rupees at risk. BTW, I presume, a balcony ticket does not cost that much in North Parur.

Posted by Madman | Report as abusive