India Masala

Bollywood and culture in an emerging India

Kurbaan: Old wine, better packaged

November 20, 2009

If you watched Kabir Khan’s “New York” this summer, you won’t find much novelty in Rensil D’Silva’s “Kurbaan”. The storyline is pretty much the same, except for a few cosmetic differences.

There is an educated, suave man living a double life as a terrorist, his beautiful wife who doesn’t know about his identity and the “third man” who tries to help the family.

However, D’Silva still manages to draw you into his story, thanks to some taut moments, a fast-paced first half, and some slick packaging.

Kareena Kapoor plays Avantika, a New York professor who falls in love and gets married to colleague Ehsaan Khan (Saif Ali Khan).

They buy a house in an Indian neighbourhood and on their first night there, are introduced to their neighbours, a group of conservative Muslims — who seem to be hiding something.

Avantika soon realises she has to make a choice between her marriage and what is right.

She meets Riyaz Masood (Viveik Oberoi), a reporter with a local channel who helps her expose the truth, but they both find they are pawns in a larger game.
The film maintains a tight pace in the first half but slackens in the second, when all the surprises in the story seem to die out.

Also, D’Silva hardly dwells on the relationship between Ehsaan and Avantika, when that could have been the main draw of the film.

The dialogue is unimaginative in places, and so are the character sketches. Saif’s character comes across as half-baked and we never see why he made the transition from an ordinary man into a terrorist.

There are good points however — the few confrontation scenes between Ehsaan and Avantika are taut and the chemistry is crackling. Also, even though the director does oversimplify the themes of Islamic fundamentalism and jihad, the film does make some pertinent points which hit home.

Of the performances, Saif Ali Khan is stranded with a badly written role that doesn’t allow him to explore the character much. Kareena Kapoor does well, playing the part of the trapped wife to perfection. Viveik Oberoi’s character demanded that he be understated, instead the actor goes for over-the-top acting, thus ruining the effect.

“Kurbaan” is a good one-time-watch.

Comments

I could not able to watch ‘New york’ but after reading the review, i don’t want to miss ‘Kurbaan’.

 

as per the details i thought, this movie is good and hopefully like the same as a Newyork. good one

Posted by Ankit Shah | Report as abusive
 

thanx for this review.i ll never see this movie

 

I thought Kurbaan was well acted out with great screenplay. The couple’s coo-chee-cooing got too mushy in places, as did the inane crying and some inexplicable scenes. However, the second half where the plot unfolded was done decently. The actors have all put in decent performances, and the screenplay and the use of music and the pace of the movie doesn’t slack. All in all, it is good to see that movies like this don’t sugarcoat important issues like terrorism and useful stereotypes too, lest the liberal media brainwash us to forget them.

Posted by Rajesh | Report as abusive
 

This was the worst movie i had ever seen, the second was intolerable. I couldn’t believe Kareena and Saif could act so stupidly.And i heard some where Kareena mentioned that this is the best role she has ever done…. i am so shocked… Terrible movie… real boring!!

Posted by Kurbaanhater | Report as abusive
 

i loved this movie,it was better than NEWYORK.. SAIF-KAREENA’S CHEMISTRY IS WONDERFUL.AND BEST ROLE WAS FOR KIRAN KHER, SHE ACTED VERY WELL, AND OM PURI AS WELL. THE SONGS ARE REALLY GOOD.OVERALL ITS A VERY GOOD MOVIE…

Posted by zaiadi | Report as abusive
 

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