India Masala

Bollywood and culture in an emerging India

If only Bollywood had discovered Freida

September 6, 2010
When Frieda Pinto made it big on the international stage with “Slumdog Millionaire”, there were quite a few who couldn’t quite believe her success.
While she was feted all over the world, found herself on prestigious magazine covers, and on high-profile red carpets, in the country of her birth, there was some reluctant praise and a lot of silence, which is unusual for a country that “adopts” anyone who sounds remotely Indian and is a success in the West.
After Slumdog, Pinto got to work with two of Hollywood’s biggest directors, Woody Allen and Julian Schnabel (“The Divng Bell and the Butterfly”), and I think I have seen more press about Anil Kapoor playing a bit role in the US series “24” than Pinto’s appearances in these two films.
And now that the two films have done the rounds of the festival circuit, and the reviews haven’t been too good, there are media reports again, almost writing her off as an actor.
I wish we would appreciate that she has been where even the biggest guns from Bollwyood tried to go and failed. She has shared the stage as an equal with names such as Anthony Hopkins and didn’t have to rely on being the geeky Indian friend/sidekick kind of roles to make her foray into Hollywood.
I think we just can’t believe we didn’t discover her first.

friedaWhen Freida Pinto made it big on the international stage with “Slumdog Millionaire“, there were quite a few who couldn’t quite believe her success.

While she was feted all over the world, found herself on prestigious magazine covers and on high-profile red carpets, in the country of her birth, there was some reluctant praise and a lot of silence which is unusual for a country that “adopts” anyone who sounds remotely Indian and is a success in the West.

After ‘Slumdog’, Pinto got to work with two of Hollywood’s biggest directors, Woody Allen and Julian Schnabel (“The Diving Bell and the Butterfly”), and I think I have seen more press about Anil Kapoor playing a bit role in the American TV series “24″ than Pinto’s appearances in these two films.

And now that the two films have done the rounds of the festival circuit and the reviews haven’t been too good, there are media reports again — almost writing her off as an actor.

I wish we would appreciate that she has been where even the biggest guns from Bollywood tried to go and failed. She has shared the stage as an equal with names such as Anthony Hopkins and didn’t have to rely on being the geeky Indian friend/sidekick kind of roles to make her foray into Hollywood.

I think we just can’t believe we didn’t discover her first.

Comments

Maybe it’s just too early to acknowledge her as a Hollywood hopeful. The most positive reviews in the West paint her as glamorous but a non-actor. Certainly no Oscar in the offing there.

Posted by kneetoe | Report as abusive
 

can be clubbed in the league of salma hayek, Ana Hathway, Catherine zeta Jones……. and not in the league of Cate blanchet, Julia Roberts and the likes….. even the best of Bollywood ladies (present lot)cannot be clubbed in the latter league….

Posted by mailramz | Report as abusive
 

Frieda Pinto for all her success wasn’t the most promising talent from Slumdog Millionaire and it was good fortune (and maybe a good agent) that she got a break in Hollywood. It must also be admitted that everyone and her uncle wanted to have some link with Frieda after the Oscars, with one brand even coming out with advertisements featuring her despite Pinto having done the modelling for it earlier. Sometimes there is a fall after a rise, and perhaps the lack of any known future projects is why she is being written off?

Posted by Gobblygook | Report as abusive
 

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