India Masala

Bollywood and culture in an emerging India

Rakht Charitra 2: Story hidden beneath blood and gore

December 3, 2010
If you are willing to look beyond the gory death scenes, the deafening background music and crazy camera angles, there is an interesting story to be told in Ram Gopal Varma’s “Rakht Charitra 2″.
The problem is, like in the first part of the film, the actual story is buried deep within, managing to resurface once in a while.
“Rakht Charitra 2″, the second part of Varma’s film based on Andhra Pradesh politician Paritala Ravi takes off where the prequel left off — the rise of Ravi (Viveik Oberoi) and his ultimate fall at the hands of Suriya, the son of one of the people he killed on his quest for revenge.
In a vicious circle of revenge, Suriya sets out to avenge the deaths of his family at the hands of Ravi, and the two engage in a bloody tussle, giving Varma plenty of scope for junior artistes to be killed off with scythes and pistols, in the middle of streets, in crowded courtrooms and prisons.
Sporadically, the camera turns 180 degrees, the music rises to a crescendo even when nothing is happening, and an over-the-top narrator tells us why the revenge saga will never end.
Like I said earlier, the battle between the two men is interesting, and the one scene where they are face to face, is one of the powerful ones in “Rakht Charitra 2″.
But Varma manages to kill off that chemistry with his loud and almost jingoistic method of story-telling.
Of the performances, Oberoi carries on the intensity of his performance in the first film, and Tamil actor Suriya plays his character with conviction and fire.
The two leading ladies, Priyamani and Radhika Apte, do have their moments, but their roles don’t give them enough meat to really display much acting.
I’m not sure the filmmaker needed to release the two films within three weeks of each other though — I think I was yet to get over the blood and gore in the last one. If you can look beyond all that, this one might be worth a watch.

RC2If you are willing to look beyond the gory death scenes, the deafening background music and crazy camera angles, there is an interesting story to be told in Ram Gopal Varma’s “Rakht Charitra 2″.

The problem is, like in the first part of the film, the actual story is buried deep within, managing to resurface once in a while.

“Rakht Charitra 2″, the second part of Varma’s film based on Andhra Pradesh politician Paritala Ravi takes off where the prequel left off — the rise of Ravi (Viveik Oberoi) and his ultimate fall at the hands of Suriya, the son of one of the people he killed on his quest for revenge.

In a vicious circle of revenge, Suriya sets out to avenge the deaths of his family at the hands of Ravi, and the two engage in a bloody tussle, giving Varma plenty of scope for junior artistes to be killed off with scythes and pistols, in the middle of streets, in crowded courtrooms and prisons.

Sporadically, the camera turns 180 degrees, the music rises to a crescendo even when nothing is happening, and an over-the-top narrator tells us why the revenge saga will never end.

Like I said earlier, the battle between the two men is interesting, and the one scene where they are face to face, is one of the powerful ones in “Rakht Charitra 2″.

But Varma manages to kill off that chemistry with his loud and almost jingoistic method of story-telling.

Of the performances, Oberoi carries on the intensity of his performance in the first film, and Tamil actor Suriya plays his character with conviction and fire.

The two leading ladies, Priyamani and Radhika Apte, do have their moments, but their roles don’t give them enough meat to really display much acting.

I’m not sure the filmmaker needed to release the two films within three weeks of each other though — I think I was yet to get over the blood and gore in the last one. If you can look beyond all that, this one might be worth a watch.

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