Double Dhamaal: Twice the agony

June 24, 2011

Indra Kumar’s “Double Dhamaal” is a sequel to the 2007 comedy “Dhamaal” and tells the story of four men whose plans to make a quick buck are foiled by their arch nemesis.

The story takes off from where the four, after having donated all the money they won to charity, are back to being jobless and penniless. But when they come across their arch nemesis Kabir Nayak (Sanjay Dutt) and see that he’s rich and successful, they decide to feed off his wealth. Riteish Deshmukh, Ashish Chowdhry, Arshad Warsi and Jaaved Jaafery play the roles of the four friends.

What they don’t know is Kabir is out to double-cross them. He convinces them he has found crude oil in Mumbai, asks them to get investors and then runs away with the money to Macau.

The four friends follow him there and decide to exact revenge.

This is, needless to say, a brainless comedy — one that has plenty of toilet humour, raunchy songs and gags that the filmmakers definitely thought were hilarious — like a kissing scene between two gorillas and people using real blood as ketchup with their fries.

If you liked the first film, you will be disappointed by the second. There are some funny moments but they are so fleeting, you are likely to miss them if you don’t pay attention, which is more than likely, because the film doesn’t manage to hold it for too long.

Movies like this make me wonder whatever happened to real humour. Do we need to have balls flying at private parts to make people laugh? Of course, given that everyone around me (at a 9 a.m. show) was laughing like crazy, means the answer is yes. I don’t know whether this is a telling comment on the audience or the people who make these movies. Or both.

I think if I’m made to watch another brainless comedy at the theatres, I might just scream.

No comments so far

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/