India Masala

Bollywood and culture in an emerging India

Jodi Breakers: The ‘Headachers’

February 24, 2012

‘Tis the season for romance — at least in Bollywood. After “Ek Main aur Ekk Tu“ and “Ekk Deewana Tha“ this month, comes Ashwini Chaudhary’s “Jodi Breakers“, another film that attempts to bring together romance and comedy and hopes to leave you with a warm, fuzzy feeling in your tummy. And fails spectacularly, I might add.

R. Madhavan plays Sid, a divorcee, who after his split turns into a divorce specialist, “breaking up” couples when one of them wants out. Bipasha Basu plays Sonali, his partner who, of course, falls hopelessly in love with him.

When the duo are entrusted with the job of “breaking up” a rich businessman (Milind Soman) and his girlfriend (Dipannita Sharma), Sid neglects to mention that he has a personal interest in this case, hurting Sonali and causing a rift between the two.

Chaudhary’s brand of humour is somewhere between silly and crass. Everyone, from Omi Vaidya (who plays a Casanova) to Helen, playing a shrill-voiced grandmother, is trying too hard to be funny, which is very difficult given that the jokes aren’t funny at all.

The film is peppered with inane dialogues and Sid’s constant references to his beloved car, which is called Horny. This is one of those films that had the germ of a good idea but got horribly lost in translation.

Of the cast, Milind Soman and Dipannita Sharma look great together and actually have some chemistry, something that the lead pair is missing. When you see the four together, you might be forgiven for forgetting that it’s Sonali and Sid’s love story we are supposed to be watching.

Madhavan, unfortunately, doesn’t look the part and has no chemistry with Bipasha, which means you hardly care when they break up or get together. Vaidya and Helen are more irritating than Priyanka Chopra was in “Agneepath” and have the worst dialogues in the film.

Barring a couple of laughs, this film isn’t worth it. Go for it only if you must.

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