Aashiqui 2: Tuneless tale

April 26, 2013

Mohit Suri may have done the impossible and crammed every single romantic movie cliché in “Aashiqui 2”. There are traces of the 1973 hit “Abhimaan” along with the original “Aashiqui” (1990). Director Suri tries to inject an intense vibe in his new film, but fails miserably.

Rahul Jaykar (Aditya Roy Kapoor), a rock star who is slowly slipping away into oblivion thanks to his alcoholism, spots Aarohi (Shraddha Kapoor) singing in a Goan bar. One look and he is smitten, convinced of her talent and ready to take her to Mumbai to make her a star.

Aarohi is equally smitten and follows Rahul back to Mumbai. A couple of misunderstandings later, she predictably becomes a huge star — releasing albums, singing songs and performing on stage.

But Rahul is drinking his way to destruction despite Aarohi’s attempts to pull him back. Her success and his depression mean that their relationship teeters on the edge.

The director has no regard for attention to detail or any kind of authenticity. He seems to have sleepwalked through “Aashiqui 2” – characters go vegetable shopping in the middle of the night in Goa (believe me, you won’t find a vendor after 7 p.m. anywhere in the state), rock stars get famous overnight, reporters heckle them for seemingly no reason, while singers who haven’t been in the business for a year can afford to buy palatial houses in Mumbai’s pricey real estate market.

All this could be ignored but Shagufta Rafique’s screenplay is an example of lazy writing. As for the cast, Aditya Roy Kapoor is cringeworthy. Shraddha Kapoor does put in an effort but is hindered by a run-of-the-mill story that goes nowhere.

The music is hummable but certainly not comparable to the lilting melodies of the first “Aashiqui”. Suri tries to lend a “timeless love story” feel to his film, but ends up making a love story with no soul, no substance and certainly no sense.

 

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