India Masala

Bollywood and culture in an emerging India

from India Insight:

Kids rule the roost as Bollywood woos audiences

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(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

Mumbai resident Gopal Das doesn't usually go to the movies. It's the children who drag him and his wife to the cinema to watch the latest Bollywood film.

Das's 8-year-old son Shubham insisted on watching Shah Rukh Khan's "Chennai Express" on his birthday this week. His teenage sister had recommended it.

"They both said they don't want a cake or dinner out," Das told India Insight as he waited with his children at a city multiplex. "We usually don't watch movies, only the ones they want to watch."

Das is not alone. As Bollywood tries to bring in ever more movie watchers, producers and filmmakers are finding that it's worth marketing to children as much as they can, even for films that are meant for adults.

Roadside Romeo — Doggy tale gone wrong

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When you find the villain of the film more endearing than the hero and even 90 minutes seem like a lifetime, there has to be something wrong with the film. 

That’s right. Charlie Anna, the heavy, farting and bespectacled bulldog with a south Indian accent, who throws a spanner in Romeo’s plans, is way more entertaining and funny than the protagonist of Roadside Romeo

Tahaan: Stark, beautiful but with character flaws

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When the credits roll at the end of Santosh Sivan’s “Tahaan” , there is a disclaimer which reads ‘This is a fable with fictitious people and non fictitious incidents,” or something to that effect.

TahaanThat sentence pretty much sums up this two-hour film. “Tahaan” has a surreal, almost fable-like look and feel to it, which remains consistent almost throughout the film.

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