Comments on: Twitter panic in the newsroom http://blogs.reuters.com/jackshafer/2014/07/10/twitter-panic-in-the-newsroom/ Tue, 10 Feb 2015 19:54:39 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: shawebdesign http://blogs.reuters.com/jackshafer/2014/07/10/twitter-panic-in-the-newsroom/#comment-16953 Sat, 12 Jul 2014 14:25:14 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/jackshafer/?p=3128#comment-16953 A single tweet can destroy a career

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By: silliness http://blogs.reuters.com/jackshafer/2014/07/10/twitter-panic-in-the-newsroom/#comment-16952 Sat, 12 Jul 2014 11:55:31 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/jackshafer/?p=3128#comment-16952 It’s interesting to see how certain news celebrities that I once considered intelligent and thoughtful were actually pretty crazy right wingers. Lou Dobbs, Britt Hume, Bill Hemmer are a few that come to mind. So I guess I feel duped. It’s sort of helpful to me as a news consumer to learn what kind of people to whom I am listening.

I understand why NPR doesn’t want their talent mouthing off, but I find it enlightening.

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By: tmc http://blogs.reuters.com/jackshafer/2014/07/10/twitter-panic-in-the-newsroom/#comment-16948 Fri, 11 Jul 2014 15:05:29 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/jackshafer/?p=3128#comment-16948 A single tweet can destroy a career. But I think it would take several tweets to destroy the reputation of the mentioned news agencies. But only a few. Three to five tweets could do it. Social media promotes mob mentality.

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By: Cirrhus http://blogs.reuters.com/jackshafer/2014/07/10/twitter-panic-in-the-newsroom/#comment-16947 Fri, 11 Jul 2014 12:45:23 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/jackshafer/?p=3128#comment-16947 Good article, Mr. Shafer. The signal-to-noise ratio on Twitter is very low…about like listening for something noteworthy to be said on a CB radio. But…when something does appear (like the NPR tweet), it becomes a gravity-well of commentary. Is the NPR journalist’s tweet newsworthy?…I’m not sure. Is it inflammatory?…yes. We can *think* anything we want…but when the thought is turned into a behavior (like tweeting), then it is no surprise that reactions to the objectifed idea occur. What is really surprising to me, though, is that people (journalists included) seem so unaware of their personal boundaries (and the boundaries of others) when it comes to social media. That in itself is newsworthy.

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