James Pethokoukis

Politics and policy from inside Washington

Do we need a second Obama stimulus pacakge?

May 29, 2009

Back in January when Team Obama was pushing its stimulus plan, the White House put out a self-analysis of the potential economic impact of the plan, authored by Jared Bernstein and Christina Romer.  If Congress passed the president’s plan, the report said, the U.S. unemployment rate would rise to just under 8 percent by later this year and fall to 7 percent by Q4 2010. If the plan was not passed, the reported predicted, the U.S. unemployment rate would climb to 9 percent next year.

Time for a reality check. Unemployment is already at 8.9 percent The consenus private sector estimate is that unemployment will average 9.7 percent next year. Douglas Elmendorf, head of the Congressional Budget Office, says unemployment will peak at 10.5 percent next year.  One conclusion is that we need another mega-stimulus package. An alternatve conclusion would be that the first one isn’t working and it’s time for Plan B.

Comments

I would agree that the original stimulus plan isn’t working. The plan was poorly planned and I believe that the Obama Administration rushed this plan due to all the hype generated from Obama’s campaign promises. If the country is going to move forward with another stimulus package, I think the money would be put to better use if it was invested into civil construction projects. Civil Construction projects would not only help boost the economy, but it will also help to decrease the growing unemployment, which at this point in time, getting people back to work is one of the most important issues this country faces.

Posted by Derek | Report as abusive
 

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