James Pethokoukis

Politics and policy from inside Washington

What healthcare reform might actually look like …

July 21, 2009

One Capitol Hill watcher sends me this on what a Democratic fallback position on healthcare might look like:

I think that a “compromise” plan looks something like an individual insurance mandate and some further coverage mandates/restrictions (like not allowing denial of coverage based on pre-existing conditions).  If they didn’t want to “fall quite that far back,” so to speak, they could couple such a plan with substantial subsidies for people up to 400-500% of the federal poverty level.  This would mean no “public option,” but it would still represent something the Democrats could call health care reform.

That kind of a plan would probably have some legs, assuming the cost/pay-fors weren’t an enormous problem.  … Many Republicans seem to have already conceded that an individual insurance mandate is acceptable, so I think that’s the route Democrats could use to get closer to their preferred destination.

Comments

That will just force prices up even higher! The Dems probably are ok with the means there is still a chance for universal healthcare down the road.

Posted by Clay | Report as abusive
 

I really can not understand what is the matter with he fed. they seem to think that by keeping the interest rates low that they are helping people . This ladies and gentleman is the WORST thing that can be done for the building trades and large buys.

who in this country have the most disposal income? I hope you got i right and that is seniors. and what do they spend ?? NOT their capital!!! They spend and give away there interest. so with this in mind WHO is benefiting from low interest?? The people that put us in this situation.
Please do not make us a Third Class Country . We now because of past policies now a Second Class Country.
Please do what is right for the country not Goldman Sachs

Posted by Dan Behan | Report as abusive
 

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