James Pethokoukis

Politics and policy from inside Washington

America’s perilous fiscal future: slow growth, high taxes

August 26, 2009

Howard Gleckman over at TaxVox does a great job on the new government budget forecasts. This is my favorite bit (bold is mine):

Even once the economy gets back on its feet, the White House projects spending will settle in at about 23 percent of Gross Domestic Product. That is a substantial increase from the average of 19 percent or so in recent decades, and significantly more than estimated tax revenues. We can try to run deficits of 4 percent of GDP as far as the eye can see, but only if the Chinese continue to help out.

Finally, take a look at both CBO and OMB forecasts of long-term trend economic growth: OMB figures it will be roughly 2.5 percent once all the effects of the recession and the stimulus package wash out. CBO is even more pessimistic. These forecasts are not new, but they are worth keeping in mind. Over the next decade and beyond, the economy will grow significantly more slowly than in recent years, in large part because many more Americans will be retiring than joining the workforce. And that will put growing pressure on fiscal policy.

When Budget Director Peter Orszag and others talk about medical costs being unsustainable, this mismatch between health spending and economic growth is exactly what they have in mind. In the decade 1998 to 2007, both Medicare and Medicaid grew at more than 7 percent per year. And you don’t need to be an economist to understand what will happen if medical costs keeping rising at 7 percent while the resources to pay for them grow at only 2.5 percent.

Comments

I suggest we put the “Logan’s Run” scenario on the table to fix this issue.

Posted by Idea | Report as abusive
 

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