James Pethokoukis

Politics and policy from inside Washington

Economic guru: US faces its worst two decades in history

March 29, 2010

Get ready for the Long Recession.

Well, at least a long period of time where it is going to seem like the US economy is kind of sickly. That is the conclusion of productivity guru Robert Gordon in a new paper. He says US living standards now face their slowest two-decade growth rate “since the inauguration of George Washington.” More:

The statistical trend for growth in total economy [labor productivity] ranged from 2.75 percent in early 1962 down to 1.25 percent in late 1979 and recovered to 2.45 percent in 2002. Our results on productivity trends identify a problem in the interpretation of the 2008-09 recession and conclude that at present statistical trends cannot be extended past 2007.

For the longer stretch of history back to 1891, the paper provides numerous corrections to the growth of labor quality and to capital quantity and quality, leading to significant rearrangements of the growth pattern of MFP, generally lowering the unadjusted MFP growth rates during 1928-50 and raising them after 1950. Nevertheless, by far the most rapid MFP growth in U. S. history occurred in 1928-50, a phenomenon that I have previously dubbed the “one big wave.”

The paper approaches the task of forecasting 20 years into the future by extracting relevant precedents from the growth in labor productivity and in MFP over the last seven years, the last 20 years, and the last 116 years. Its conclusion is that over the next 20 years (2007-2027) growth in real potential GDP will be 2.4 percent (the same as in 2000-07), growth in total economy labor productivity will be 1.7 percent, and growth in the more familiar concept of NFPB sector labor productivity will be 2.05 percent. The implied forecast 1.50 percent growth rate of per-capita real GDP falls far short of the historical achievement of 2.17 percent between 1929 and 2007 and represents the slowest growth of the measured American standard of living over any two-decade interval recorded since the inauguration of George Washington.

Me: There is no more basic political and economic issue than a nation’s standard of living. If  Gordon is right, this will dominate US politics as another sign of American decline.

Comments

Oh please. What rubbish. Everybody take a deep breath and chill. The reason I don’t buy into the climate change/global catastrophe theory is that I simply don’t believe anybody can predict events twenty years from now. Same goes for economic predictions. These guys can’t even predict this month’s durable goods numbers wuth anything approaching accuracy – now we’re supposed to believe their predictions TWENTY YEARS from now? C’mon, James, you’re more sceptical than that, or at least you once were.

Posted by gotthardbahn | Report as abusive
 

Or Plan B we could just throw the Democrats out of office (which even the “Greatest Generation” wouldn’t do), rip Obama’s poisoned laws out of the ground, and get our economy back to a nice happy 4.5% unemployment rate.

Posted by Joshua A. Schaeffer | Report as abusive
 

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