James Pethokoukis

Are US regulators blowing it … again

May 7, 2010

Karen Shaw Petrou at Federal Financial Analytics asks a good question:

Last Friday, we outlined the systemic-risk implications of the growing EU crisis. In the days that followed, LIBOR spreads tightened, funding dried up and our fears only rose. So, we were a bit surprised to hear a senior U.S. bank regulator tell a radio audience Thursday morning not to bother their heads about any prospects that the European crisis could wash ashore. That was, of course, followed in a few hours by a classic systemic-risk crisis on the exchanges. Was the U.S. regulator keeping the game-face on so as not to scare the children? Or, more worryingly, are U.S. regulators still unprepared for another bout of systemic risk, whistling in the dark much as they did when they told us that subprime-mortgage risk couldn’t spill over?

Greece and the 2010 US elections

May 7, 2010

The  290k increase in jobs is great news for the WH and congressional Democrats. The rising unemployment rate, from 9.7% to 9.9%, is not. Yes, it reflect workers moving back into the workforce, but it is still a lousy headline number. So, too, the rise in the broad U-6 unemployment number to 17.1%. The good news also gets drowned out by the big drop in the stock market and trouble with EU sovereign debt. Even if Greece’s problems do not metastasize, they still provide unsettling headlines for U.S. voters. Like something is still not right in the world. Then, of course, you still have the moribund U.S. housing market and all that evaporated net wealth. Stronger growth may be enough to keep Republicans from capturing the House and Senate, but big gains nonetheless.

US debt woes could explode in just three years

May 7, 2010

The great Jed Graham over at Investor’s Business Daily writes an important piece on America’s debt problems. It is not a long-term or intermediate-term issue, it is a short-term issue: