Not bad for government work

November 10, 2010

This (from USA Today)  will only encourage the Chris Christie Republicans:

Federal salaries have grown robustly in recent years, according to a USA TODAY analysis of Office of Personnel Management data. Key findings:

•Government-wide raises. Top-paid staff have increased in every department and agency. The Defense Department had nine civilians earning $170,000 or more in 2005, 214 when Obama took office and 994 in June.

•Long-time workers thrive. The biggest pay hikes have gone to employees who have been with the government for 15 to 24 years. Since 2005, average salaries for this group climbed 25% compared with a 9% inflation rate.

•Physicians rewarded. Medical doctors at veterans hospitals, prisons and elsewhere earn an average of $179,500, up from $111,000 in 2005.

Federal workers earning $150,000 or more make up 3.9% of the workforce, up from 0.4% in 2005. Since 2000, federal pay and benefits have increased 3% annually above inflation compared with 0.8% for private workers, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis. Members of Congress earn $174,000, up from $141,300 in 2000, an increase below the rate of inflation.

Congressional Republicans have definitely noticed what has been going on in New Jersey and would love to  trim federal payrolls. Indeed, within their “Pledge to America” is this proposal: “We will impose a net hiring freeze on non-security federal employees and ensure the public sector no longer grows at the expense of the private sector.” As it is, half of federal workers are due to retire in the next five years, by some estimates. Not replacing all of them is an option, I suppose.

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