James Pethokoukis

Politics and policy from inside Washington

US tax deal, budget feud set stage for 2011 cuts

Dec 17, 2010 23:23 UTC

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

To nations suffering austerity, it must seem as if Washington has gone mad. First, the U.S. Congress fails to agree on a 2011 budget. Then lawmakers overwhelmingly pass another giant stimulus. But both events actually hint at some chance of more disciplined fiscal action next year.

President Barack Obama will quickly sign the $858 billion stimulus/tax cut bill that funds unemployment benefits for 13 months and extends Bush-era tax cuts for two years. Of course, the bulk of the headline cost — $500 billion — comes simply from keeping tax rates as they have been, so it’s not traditional stimulus. It’s just keeping bad stuff from happening. And government bean counters would not score the renewal of a temporary welfare program as a spending increase. Still, the bill does delay any effort at deficit reduction since it does not pay for funding jobless benefits.

All this makes budget hawks wince, both at home and abroad. But even the International Monetary Fund concedes that America has the capacity to boost its sluggish economy through short-term tax cuts or spending increases — as long as it has in place a credible plan to reduce the longer-term fiscal gap. (And the best deficit strategy is cutting spending while also boosting growth through smart ( meaning low) tax policy.

That plan isn’t drawn up yet, but it could be getting closer. Democrats and Republicans in Congress are gridlocked over the $1.1 trillion budget for 2011. So they will probably pass a temporary spending measure to keep the government running for another month or two. This creates a situation next year where the flood of new Tea Party Republicans can combine a threat of government shutdown with a refusal to raise the national debt ceiling so as to squeeze spending cuts out of Obama and congressional Democrats.

Indeed, some GOP insiders believe the president –  with a bit of nudging — may be ready to strike a deal to reform the tax system and cut future Social Security benefits along lines suggested by his own debt commission earlier this month. And as the tax compromise shows, Obama now seems willing to anger some within his own party in order to get legislation passed.

The key to any longer-term deal on the deficit is to make it happen before presidential politics starts to intrude by the middle of 2011. That’s not going to be easy — but the flurry of activity at the end of 2010 provides a glimmer of hope.

The seeds of change

Dec 17, 2010 17:21 UTC

Yuval Levin sums things up correctly and thusly:

This opening of the eyes of the Republican appropriators (brought about by a groundswell of outrage from conservatives) is the most important part of the omnibus story, and maybe of the lame-duck Congress in general. Combined with the minor revolution John Boehner is attempting to enable in the House Appropriations Committee (by appointing some new members who might be best thought of as a kind of crop of anti-appropriators) it has the potential to change the culture of Congress (which has long consisted of three parties: Republicans, Democrats, and appropriators) in a very important and constructive way—if it lasts.

Congress throws a tea party

Dec 17, 2010 17:07 UTC

Overall, a pretty good day for those who believe in low taxes and less spending. Here is the money graph from my upcoming Reuters Breakingviews column:

Democrats and Republicans in Congress are gridlocked over the $1.1 trillion 2011 budget. So they will likely pass a temporary spending measure to keep the government running for another month or two. This creates a situation next year where incoming Tea Party Republicans can a) combine a threat of government shutdown with b) a refusal to raise the national debt ceiling to c) squeeze deep spending cuts from Obama and congressional Democrats. Indeed, some GOP insiders believe the president —  with a bit of nudging — may be ready to strike a deal on tax reform and cutting future Social Security benefits along lines suggested by his own debt commission earlier this month. And as the tax compromise shows, Obama is now seems more than willing to anger liberals within his own party and scuttle past campaign promises to get legislation passed.

Of course, the biggie is healthcare and that is going to have to be settle by voters in 2012.  But what a change from January 2009 when Obama’s election was supposed to signify a generational political swing toward more activist government.

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