No ‘substantial effect’ on long-term budget woes

February 14, 2011

Hey, it’s not just me pointing out the many flaws in the Obama budget. This from the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget:

Unfortunately, the Administration does not achieve either of the fiscal goals it established for
its own Fiscal Commission. For one, the budget does  not reach primary balance in 2015.
Instead, at just over $600 billion, the deficit remains more than $100 billion away from
primary balance. Secondly, the budget does not make meaningful improvements to the longterm fiscal outlook. Few of the policies in the budget would have a substantial effect on the
trajectory of spending or revenues outside of the ten-year window.
As noted above, the level at which the budget stabilizes the debt – 77 percent of GDP – is
way too high. It is well above historical levels (about 40 percent of GDP) and the traditional
target of 60 percent of GDP – and could threaten the government’s ability to borrow in case
of a real emergency down the road. It also begins to creep up again at the end of the ten-year
window, and likely will grow substantially beyond this window.
Unfortunately, the budget doesn’t make any meaningful improvements to the largest
problem areas of the budget. The budget does keep defense costs from increasing, trim
Medicare and Medicaid spending a bit, and limit tax expenditures for high earners. But these
measures only scratch the surface when the Administration should be calling for real
defense cuts, serious changes in federal health spending, and fundamental tax reform – as
well as Social Security reform designed to achieve 75-year sustainable solvency.

Unfortunately, the Administration does not achieve either of the fiscal goals it established for  its own Fiscal Commission. For one, the budget does  not reach primary balance in 2015.  Instead, at just over $600 billion, the deficit remains more than $100 billion away from  primary balance. Secondly, the budget does not make meaningful improvements to the longterm fiscal outlook. Few of the policies in the budget would have a substantial effect on the  trajectory of spending or revenues outside of the ten-year window.

As noted above, the level at which the budget stabilizes the debt – 77 percent of GDP – is  way too high. It is well above historical levels (about 40 percent of GDP) and the traditional  target of 60 percent of GDP – and could threaten the government’s ability to borrow in case  of a real emergency down the road. It also begins to creep up again at the end of the ten-year  window, and likely will grow substantially beyond this window.

Unfortunately, the budget doesn’t make any meaningful improvements to the largest  problem areas of the budget. The budget does keep defense costs from increasing, trim  Medicare and Medicaid spending a bit, and limit tax expenditures for high earners. But these  measures only scratch the surface when the Administration should be calling for real  defense cuts, serious changes in federal health spending, and fundamental tax reform – as  well as Social Security reform designed to achieve 75-year sustainable solvency.

One comment

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perhaps it would help us all understand if someone would put in plain english the effects of having a high and prolonged defecit. I’m conservative, but so far, I don’t see how the defecit has done much to the average joe in america. Certainly hasn’t hurt the stock market lately.

Posted by zotdoc | Report as abusive