James Pethokoukis

Should America be more like Denmark?

October 8, 2009

Blogger Matthew Yglesias talks up Denmark and high taxes over at ThinkProgress:

The overwhelming fact about Danish public policy is that taxes in Denmark are really high. There’s a substantial VAT and also a substantial income tax. You pay taxes to buy a car, and you pay higher taxes for heavy cars. Gasoline taxes are high (gas costs almost $7.50 a gallon) as are taxes on electricity, which account for more than half the cost of electricity to consumers. In exchange for all this, the Danes have basically achieved all the stuff progressives say they want. The country is rich, clean, and highly egalitarian. The high taxes finance generous public services, and the high levels of expenditure allow the country to do without a lot of extraneous business regulation which helps keep the place economically dynamic. According to surveys, the people are all very happy, which is exactly what you would expect from a very rich, very egalitarian society. And as this trip has emphasized, they do it all while doing much less polluting than Americans do, despite a higher average material standard of living.

How about a $1.4 trillion (a year!) tax increase?

September 1, 2009

It always amazes me when people act as if raising taxes has no impact on economic growth, like this article from a Financial Post columnist who advocates raising US taxes by $1.4 trillion a year:

U.S. corporate tax rates vs. the world (OECD)

August 7, 2009

How does the US corporate tax rate stack up against other nations? Take a look (via the Tax Foundation):

America’s top 1 percent pay 40 percent of all taxes

July 30, 2009

The Tax Foundation review of new IRS data (through 2007) finds some remarkable things about America’s progressive tax system:

The healthcare surtax and US competitiveness

July 8, 2009

The Cato Institute put together a nice chart looking at global tax rates:

tax-rates

Why Europe wants America to raise taxes

June 30, 2009

When the G20 went after tax havens last April, I said it was just a first step toward a push for “tax harmonization,”  a fancy phrase that really means getting low-tax nations to raise their tax rates. Then I see what the prime minister of Finland is advocating: