James Pethokoukis

The chart that keeps the WH econ team up at night

December 4, 2009

A nice jobs report. A long way to go, as this chart from Calculated Risk shows:

jobchart

The November jobs report and the 2010 midterms

December 4, 2009

A few thoughts, sports fans:

1)  The drop in the U3 rate is welcome news for the WH, congressional Dems (and US workers, of course). But it is really just a smoothing out of last month’s weird pop from 9.8 percent to 10.2 percent. As Action Economics notes:

The White House and jobs stimulus

December 3, 2009

From Marc Ambinder:

Really: the White House does not seem to believe that (a) anything sensible to meanginfully reduce the unemployment rate can be proposed, completed and paid for — and executed — by next November. Nothing, in any event, that wouldn’t jeopardize recovery in the long-term. This frustrates people in the party to no end, as well it might.

How Obama is freezing the job market

December 3, 2009

Let’s assume that the much-hyped White House “jobs summit” turns out to be a free-flowing exchange of ideas and views. Could happen. If that’s the case, then President Barack Obama shouldn’t be shocked if a few CEOs dare suggest that the sweeping-yet-stalled Obama agenda might … actually … you know … no offense, Mr. President … be contributing to the jobless recovery. (The union and academic invitees will protest mightily, natch.)

Goldman Sachs 2011 forecast would be an absolute disaster for Dems

December 3, 2009

This would be New Normal with extreme prejudice. Bad for Democratic incumbents in the 2010 congressional midterms, but it should make the White House political team nervous as well for 2012. If Goldman Sachs is right, of course. Here is the firm’s 2011 forecast:

Why the U.S. may have a long-term unemployment problem

November 30, 2009

Wachovia’s John Silvia:

In recent years, permanent layoffs have surpassed temporary layoffs and this is reflected in the rapid rise in the mean duration of unemployment. In addition, the disparity of unemployment by education levels signals that the demand of employers for more highly educated workers does not fit well with the available supply of workers. Current policy initiatives have perverse economic effects. Health care mandates will likely raise the cost of labor and thereby discourage hiring.

Here is a way to create jobs

November 30, 2009

From Gary Becker:

My favorite approach it to try to stimulate the economy by cutting income taxes, especially corporate income taxes and other taxes on capital, both physical and human capital. Such tax cuts will stimulate investments in the economy, and in this way increase the demand for workers.

Does Washington really get the jobs crisis?

November 27, 2009

David Rosenberg of Gluskin Sheff doesn’t think so:

These attempts to stimulate consumption at a time when household spending relative to GDP is already at an all-time high are not going to carry much of a multiplier impact. There is a youth unemployment crisis, a skills crisis, a crisis among the ability of small businesses, who have been responsible for 65% of the new hiring in the U.S.A. over the past 15 years — to secure financing for working capital purposes, there is a crisis in terms of a declining manufacturing capital stock, and the programs we get are these old and tired Keynesian attempts at temporary boosts to consumer demand. It truly boggles the mind, and as we show below, American taxpayers are still a long, long way from paying for all these transitory fiscal policies out of Washington.

Goldman Sachs forecasts nightmare 2010 economic scenario for Dems

November 21, 2009

Trust me, these are not the kind of numbers that the White House and congressional Democrats want to see. Goldman Sachs is now forecasting unemployment to rise all next year, peaking at 10.5 percent. The firm expects the economy to grow at just 2.1 percent. Also, the budget deficit will be a few billion bigger at $1.6 trillion. If correct, these stats absolutely confirm the collective freakout happening right now among Ds on Capitol Hill, such as calling for Geithner to resign. Economist Jan Hatzius:

Here’s what happened to cap-and-trade, and why it’s in deep trouble

November 17, 2009

I am writing a column on this for later today, but I wanted to toss out a few quick thoughts on the state of cap-and-trade. Other than the die-hard greenies, Dems don’t want this bill anymore than Republicans. It is too easy to frame cap-and-trade as both a jobs killer and a distraction from job creation. Actually, some Rs would love for Dems to push this bill since it makes such a great election issue.