UK austerity vs U.S. muddle

January 27, 2011

The trans-Atlantic economic contrast is shaping up as pitting British austerity against, not U.S. investment, but a do-little American muddle.

A State of the Union the markets will like

January 26, 2011

This is probably a State of the Union the markets will like. That might not necessarily be such a good thing.

Good-bye credit crunch, Hello slog

January 25, 2011

If you have forgotten the credit crunch it appears you have company: U.S. banks are lending again.

The great 20-year-long elderly trade

January 20, 2011

The great trade of the next 20 years may be out of the things that the old sell — houses, stocks and bonds — and into what they continue to consume: food, energy and medical care.

Fed hits its 3rd mandate: rising shares

January 18, 2011

James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Apparently not satisfied with being unable to fulfill its dual target of price stability and maximum employment the Federal Reserve has set itself a third mandate: higher asset prices.

Much depends on, gulp, German consumer

January 13, 2011

If the euro is going to survive without a Depression, German consumers are going to have to behave in ways that are, well, distinctly un-German.

Ailing Belgium could be game changer

January 11, 2011

James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Just when it looked like Spain would force the euro zone to get serious about destroying its crippling debts, here comes plucky Belgium, hobbling its way to history.

Housing means QE is here to stay

January 6, 2011

James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

A very poor outlook for housing will hold the U.S. economy back in coming months, making it very unlikely that the Federal Reserve will be able to step back from their emergency room monetary measures.

The rise and rise of capital controls

January 4, 2011

James Saft is a Reuters columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Look for a flood of new capital controls in 2011 as emerging market states seek a measure of protection against the easy money being generated by the United States, Europe and Japan.