COLUMN: UBS and too-big-to-punish – James Saft

December 26, 2012

Dec 26 (Reuters) – As well as too-big-to-fail it looks as if
we must think of our largest banks as too-big-to-punish as well.

UBS and too-big-to-punish: James Saft

December 26, 2012

By James Saft

(Reuters) – As well as too-big-to-fail it looks as if we must think of our largest banks as too-big-to-punish as well.

The 3 Ls of 2013: low growth, low returns, lower risk

December 21, 2012

Dec 20 (Reuters) – Look to 2013 to be the year of three
Ls: Low growth, low returns, and thankfully, lower risk.

Corporate bond risk gets silly once again: James Saft

December 19, 2012

Dec 19 (Reuters) – Proving yet again that history rhymes
rather than repeats, just a few short years after an epochal
crash the search for yield just gets wilder and wilder.

Abe’s threat to banks and the old: James Saft

December 18, 2012

By James Saft

(Reuters) – Japanese banks and pensioners will be first in line to feel the pain if Japan successfully reignites inflation and inflates away its debts.

Who ate the market volatility?

December 13, 2012

By James Saft

(Reuters) – For an uncertain world – one with fiscal cliffs, eurozone recession and regime change at the Federal Reserve – it sure is quiet out there.

SAFT ON WEALTH: Who ate the market volatility?

December 13, 2012

Dec 14 (Reuters) – For an uncertain world – one with fiscal
cliffs, eurozone recession and regime change at the Federal
Reserve – it sure is quiet out there.

AIG “profits” an insult to the concept: James Saft

December 12, 2012

By James Saft

(Reuters) – To say taxpayers made money from their investment in AIG is to libel the very concept of profit.

The perversity of student debt: James Saft

December 11, 2012

Dec 11 (Reuters) – U.S. student debt levels are surging but
along with degrees and skills the loans are producing perverse
incentives and unforeseen economic consequences.

The yen gets it in the end: James Saft

December 4, 2012

By James Saft

(Reuters) – What happens when an over-valued currency meets a political leader seemingly bent on imposing his vision on a battered central bank?