Opinion

James Saft

Column: Revenge of the markets – James Saft

May 23, 2013 19:58 UTC

By James Saft

(Reuters) – For months, markets have been dancing to central bankers’ tune, but that may now be changing.

It must have been fun to be a central banker in the early part of 2013: You say “jump” and Mr. Market says “how high?”

That seems to have ended rather abruptly in the 24 hours beginning with the Bank of Japan’s disappointing response to bond market volatility on Thursday and including Ben Bernanke’s anodyne but market-roiling comments on Wednesday on the possibility of a policy taper.

Tokyo’s Nikkei tumbled more than 7 percent on Thursday, European shares suffered their worst day in about 10 months and even the perpetual paper wealth machine known as Wall Street fell, with the S&P 500 down by as much as 1 percent before leveling off.

The re-introduction of this kind of two-way risk, both for markets and for policymakers, highlights some of the difficulties of the heavy reliance on asset-pricing markets as a policy tool.

COLUMN: Revenge of the markets: James Saft

May 23, 2013 19:54 UTC

May 23 (Reuters) – For months, markets have been dancing to
central bankers’ tune, but that may now be changing.

It must have been fun to be a central banker in the early
part of 2013: You say “jump” and Mr. Market says “how high?”

That seems to have ended rather abruptly in the 24 hours
beginning with the Bank of Japan’s disappointing response to
bond market volatility on Thursday and including Ben Bernanke’s
anodyne but market-roiling comments on Wednesday on the
possibility of a policy taper.

Japan rates may torpedo recovery

May 22, 2013 20:10 UTC

By James Saft

(Reuters) – Spiking interest rates in Japan threaten to undermine, and possibly end, the recovery being engendered by Abenomics.

That could reverse gains not only in Tokyo stocks, but in stock markets world-wide which have benefited from Japanese liquidity.

While a rebound in activity has allowed the Bank of Japan to upgrade its assessment of conditions for a fifth straight month, bond yields have risen sharply in extremely volatile conditions.

Bernanke’s dangerous optimism: James Saft

May 21, 2013 04:00 UTC

May 21 (Reuters) – Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke is
an optimist about economic growth in the coming decades,
rejecting “depressing” views about a slowdown to put his faith
in collaborative innovation driven by a jackpot culture for
inventors.

For his mental health, let’s hope he believes it.

For our economic wellbeing, let’s hope he doesn’t act on it.

While a series of economic revolutions has driven a 30-fold
increase in living standards between 1700 and 1970, economists
have recently fretted that the information technology changes of
recent years will yield less growth.

Bernanke, speaking last weekend to graduates at Bard College
at Simon’s Rock, in Massachusetts, was having nothing of it. Not
only will humans continue to innovate and to find ways to wring
value out of recent innovations, the rise of the Internet allows
for massive and rapid collaboration, he argued. And, as Mark
Zuckerberg can tell you, the potential rewards for innovation
exceed those in the past.

Column: QE and the portfolio puzzle – James Saft

May 16, 2013 20:50 UTC

By James Saft

(Reuters) – Quantitative easing may well be pushing investors to hold more cash rather than risk assets, blunting its impact as monetary policy.

Known as the portfolio rebalancing channel, the thinking behind QE rests partly on the assumption that buying up government bonds will drive interest rates down and entice investors to tilt their holdings towards riskier investments like stocks. That in turn is supposed to goose investment and consumption.

Unfortunately, that assumption may be running afoul of, or fouling up, the way in which most investors construct their portfolios, according to Toby Nangle, head of multi-asset investments at London-based Threadneedle Investments.

QE and the portfolio puzzle: James Saft

May 16, 2013 20:03 UTC

May 16 (Reuters) – Quantitative easing may well be pushing
investors to hold more cash rather than risk assets, blunting
its impact as monetary policy.

Known as the portfolio rebalancing channel, the thinking
behind QE rests partly on the assumption that buying up
government bonds will drive interest rates down and entice
investors to tilt their holdings towards riskier investments
like stocks. That in turn is supposed to goose investment and
consumption.

Unfortunately, that assumption may be running afoul of, or
fouling up, the way in which most investors construct their
portfolios, according to Toby Nangle, head of multi-asset
investments at London-based Threadneedle Investments.

The U.S. factory renaissance and your portfolio

May 15, 2013 19:40 UTC

May 15 (Reuters) – The possible coming rebirth of U.S.
manufacturing might turn out to be the most important investment
story of the next decade, up-ending the winners and losers of
the former world order.

The U.S.’s share of global manufacturing output fell by 23
percent in the 40 years to 2010, as China rose, outsourcing
boomed and a new highly integrated global supply chain was born.
This has utterly remade the U.S. and global economies, affecting
everything from how much and how U.S. workers make money to how
most companies are organized and compete.

Now a combination of factors – from cheap U.S. energy to new
technology to a falling wage gap – may partly reverse some of
those changes, bringing some manufacturing back on-shore.

Weak yen a boon for investors, not Japan: James Saft

May 14, 2013 04:03 UTC

By James Saft

(Reuters) – Buy Japanese stocks if you must but don’t expect Abenomics and the fall of the yen to revitalize Japan’s economy.

The yen has fallen by more than 20 percent since Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who advocates aggressive monetary and fiscal policy, was elected in December, busting through the 100 yen to the dollar level last week.

In part the theory behind Abenomics is that a weaker yen will revitalize industry, which will export more and plow the proceeds into hiring and capital investment.

Mom-and-pop indicator implies headroom for stocks

May 8, 2013 19:45 UTC

NEW YORK (Reuters) – This is not your parents’ bull market.

In fact, your dad and mom very may well have abandoned the market entirely. That could be the single best indicator that stocks have room to run.

The Dow Jones industrial average closed above 15,000 for the first time on Tuesday, the same day the S&P 500 made its all-time high for the fourth consecutive trading session.

You can argue all you like about how corporate profits are vulnerable and the market is hung from the clouds on slender threads spun by Ben Bernanke, but what you can’t say is that we are in classic broad-based stock market mania.

SAFT ON WEALTH: Mom-and-pop indicator implies headroom for stocks

May 8, 2013 19:42 UTC

NEW YORK, May 8 (Reuters) – This is not your parents’ bull
market.

In fact, your dad and mom very may well have abandoned the
market entirely. That could be the single best indicator that
stocks have room to run.

The Dow Jones industrial average closed above 15,000 for the
first time on Tuesday, the same day the S&P 500 made its
all-time high for the fourth consecutive trading
session.

You can argue all you like about how corporate profits are
vulnerable and the market is hung from the clouds on slender
threads spun by Ben Bernanke, but what you can’t say is that we
are in classic broad-based stock market mania.

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