Slow house price gains to crimp start-ups: James Saft

July 18, 2014

By James Saft

(Reuters) – The outlook for house prices is dimming, and one unexpected casualty may be new jobs at start-ups.

Who’s afraid of Janet Yellen?

July 16, 2014

July 16 (Reuters) – Markets aren’t afraid of Janet Yellen,
but you might want to be.

Banco Espirito Santo and bail-ins: James Saft

July 15, 2014

By James Saft

(Reuters) РBanco Espirito Santo’s woes may not reignite the euro crisis but could give useful information about who will pay the inevitable costs.

Column: Crumbs today, jam tomorrow?

July 9, 2014

By James Saft

(Reuters) – Creating needs among consumers is both the basis of our economy and a really risky investment strategy.

Crumbs today, jam tomorrow?

July 9, 2014

July 9 (Reuters) – Creating needs among consumers is both
the basis of our economy and a really risky investment strategy.

What if the market has it right?: James Saft

July 8, 2014

July 8 (Reuters) – The past 15 years of bubbles and busts
notwithstanding, sometimes it may be best to just assume
financial markets have got it right.

Jobs data doesn’t change Yellen sweet spot: James Saft

July 3, 2014

July 3 (Reuters) – Good news on the jobs front is even
better news for investors in risk assets as it does little to
move markets away from the Janet Yellen sweet spot.

Re-thinking the equity glide path

July 2, 2014

July 2 (Reuters) – The equity weighting glide path – the
idea that savers should cut risky holdings of stocks
mechanically as they approach retirement – is an appealing
metaphor, easy to understand and instinctively right feeling.

Central banks and all tomorrow’s parties: James Saft

July 1, 2014

July 1 (Reuters) – In focusing on their traditional role as
guardians of the punchbowl, central banks are failing to see how
tonight’s party always slides into tomorrow’s need for a
hangover cure.

Drawing a line between pricey markets and globalization: James Saft

June 26, 2014

June 26 (Reuters) – If global policy makers are wrong about
globalization, and they could be, we may be in for more low
growth, low rates and the high asset prices they support.